Recently Seen

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Patrick McGroin
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Mon Jun 10, 2019 1:05 am

Speaking of sci-fi classics on youtube...

The Giant Gila Monster - 5/10 - This was cheesy and slow moving and black and white and low budget. In other words passably entertaining if you're in the mood for a 50's era giant monster movie. There are hot rods and soda shops and non-rebellious teens who look like they're in their 30's. There's an easygoing sheriff and an angry old rich guy and a requisite comic relief/town drunk and a slow moving lizard and tiny toy cars and a toy railroad train. And the wholesome hero inexplicably breaks into song a couple of times. This will only be remotely tolerable if you have a fondness for the genre.
My heart is still and awaits its hour.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Mon Jun 10, 2019 1:54 am

Charade (1963) - 9/10
If I am the Phantom, it is because man's hatred has made me so. If I shall be saved, it will be because your love redeems me.
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Re: Unforgiven (Eastwood, '92)

Post by Stu » Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:14 am

I don't currently have any new movie reviews to share here at the moment (although a number of them are still in progress), but, considering the fact that a number of current posters here weren't using this site before November of 2017, I figured it'd be a good time to re-post some of the greatest hits I'd written from before that point, starting with this write-up for Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven:
Image

It's a hell of a thing, killing a man; you take away everything he has, and everything he's ever gonna have.


Unforgiven is a film haunted by many things; as a movie, it's haunted by the cultural memory of a "moral" American West that never really existed, its main character, William Munny, is haunted by the memory of his late wife, by the atrocities he committed as a young outlaw, and by the fears he'll finally get what he deserves in the afterlife, and finally, one could argue Clint Eastwood himself was haunted, by the iconic shadows his cinematic mentors still cast over his career (Sergio Leone & Don Siegel to be exact, to whose memories the film is dedicated to). However, while Will Munny never truly escapes any of the demons haunting him, the man who portrayed him did, winning himself an Oscar for Best Director, in addition to the well-earned Best Picture Oscar the film itself received, earning it a richly-deserved status as a true modern classic.

From the first five minutes alone, it's obvious that Unforgiven is no traditional Western, when a scene of intercourse is interupted by a man slashing a prostitute's face for mocking his lack of endowment. When the local sheriff, "Little Bill" Daggett, gives the man and his friend rather light punishments, the women of the brothel conspire to offer a $1,000 "Wanted Dead" award on the two men, a catalyst that causes the notorious outlaw Will Munny to come out of "retirement". However, it's obvious from the very first moment we see him that Munny is no Man With No Name-style gunslinger; rather, he's a muddy, exhausted old man, struggling to wrangle his pigs, half of whom are sick anyway, into the pen of his small, meager farm. This demythologization of the Western outlaw continues throughout Unforgiven, as Munny gets pistol-whipped half to death, nearly dies from a fever, and, most importantly, is emotionally tortured by the memories of the past horrors he committed.

This demythologization extends to the tone and conventions of the overall Western genre as well, as the prostitutes are treated more like livestock than human beings here, the "action" scenes are realistically bloody and confused, with no exciting "quick-draw" duels in sight, and law enforcement isn't shown to be any more moral than the outlaws it opposes. Gene Hackman delivers a chillingly memorable performance as "Little" Bill, who, at first, seems like a reasonable, pragmatic man, but as the film goes on, he shows himself to be a brutal sadist, dealing mercilessly with anyone who threatens the "tranquility" of his town, often enjoying himself as he does so.

He's a man trying to achieve a good end through evil means, a moral ambiguity that extends to Will Munny as well, as it's obvious that he wouldn't have taken the job if he didn't have a family to support, he expresses constant, legitimate remorse over his past sins, and when he shoots one of the bountyheads in his gut (the one who had nothing to do the initial mutilation, it must be noted), Munny ceases firing when he hears the man's cries, and demands that his friends bring him a canteen of water, to ease the pain of a slow death. Unforgiven's absolute refusal to provide any easy answers or moral conclusions is what makes it so incredibly, undeniably powerful, and elevates into being a grand eulogy for Westerns overall, really. The whole affair has a timeless, mythical quality to it, no more so than in its masterful final shot, as Munny visits his wife's grave at sunset one last time, as the lone, sorrowful acoustic guitar of "Claudia's Theme" (written by Eastwood himself) begins playing, and the bookending text tells us:

"Some years later, Mrs. Feathers made the arduous journey to Hodgeman County to visit the final resting place of her only daughter. William Munny had long since disappeared with the children... some said to San Francisco, where it was rumored he attempted a living in dry goods. And there was nothing on the grave to explain to Mrs. Feathers why her only daughter had married a known thief and murderer, a man of notoriously violent and vicious disposition."
Final Score: 10
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:39 am

Torgo wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2019 11:30 am
Same here. The critics are being way too harsh on this one. To anyone else who is skeptical, don't let them stop you.
I think I enjoyed it more than Apocalypse. Better - and more - interpersonal drama, not to mention better action. That train scene was incredible.
Apparently, it's going to flop. I blame bad marketing, personally. I only saw the preview once, and it was at a theater. Also, it was probably a mistake to leave "X-Men" out of the title.
I dunno man, I have felt that most of the X-Men movies were pretty poor so I skipped Apocalypse altogether and nothing I saw about this one led me to believe it was going to be any better so it's less a matter of abysmal reviews making me skeptical and more a matter of me being utterly skeptical to begin with and needing great reviews for me to even consider it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:42 am

I thought Good Omens was quite good. Not without a wart or two, but quite good.
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Re: Unforgiven (Eastwood, '92)

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:52 am

Stu wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:14 am
I don't currently have any new movie reviews to share here at the moment (although a number of them are still in progress), but, considering the fact that a number of current posters here weren't using this site before November of 2017, I figured it'd be a good time to re-post some of the greatest hits I'd written from before that point, starting with this write-up for Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven:
Image

It's a hell of a thing, killing a man; you take away all he has, and all he's ever gonna have.


Unforgiven is a film haunted by many things; as a movie, it's haunted by the cultural memory of a "moral" American West that never really existed, its main character, William Munny, is haunted by the memory of his late wife, by the atrocities he committed as a young outlaw, and by the fears he'll finally get what he deserves in the afterlife, and finally, one could argue Clint Eastwood himself was haunted, by the iconic shadows his cinematic mentors still cast over his career (Sergio Leone & Don Siegel to be exact, to whose memories the film is dedicated to). However, while Will Munny never truly escapes any of the demons haunting him, the man who portrayed him did, winning himself an Oscar for Best Director, in addition to the well-earned Best Picture Oscar the film itself received, earning it a richly-deserved status as a true modern classic.

From the first five minutes alone, it's obvious that Unforgiven is no traditional Western, when a scene of intercourse is interupted by a man slashing a prostitute's face for mocking his lack of endowment. When the local sheriff, "Little Bill" Daggett, gives the man and his friend rather light punishments, the women of the brothel conspire to offer a $1,000 "Wanted Dead" award on the two men, a catalyst that causes the notorious outlaw Will Munny to come out of "retirement". However, it's obvious from the very first moment we see him that Munny is no Man With No Name-style gunslinger; rather, he's a muddy, exhausted old man, struggling to wrangle his pigs, half of whom are sick anyway, into the pen of his small, meager farm. This demythologization of the Western outlaw continues throughout Unforgiven, as Munny gets pistol-whipped half to death, nearly dies from a fever, and, most importantly, is emotionally tortured by the memories of the past horrors he committed.

This demythologization extends to the tone and conventions of the overall Western genre as well, as the prostitutes are treated more like livestock than human beings here, the "action" scenes are realistically bloody and confused, with no exciting "quick-draw" duels in sight, and law enforcement isn't shown to be any more moral than the outlaws it opposes. Gene Hackman delivers a chillingly memorable performance as "Little" Bill, who, at first, seems like a reasonable, pragmatic man, but as the film goes on, he shows himself to be a brutal sadist, dealing mercilessly with anyone who threatens the "tranquility" of his town, often enjoying himself as he does so.

He's a man trying to achieve a good end through evil means, a moral ambiguity that extends to Will Munny as well, as it's obvious that he wouldn't have taken the job if he didn't have a family to support, he expresses constant, legitimate remorse over his past sins, and when he shoots one of the bountyheads in his gut (the one who had nothing to do the initial mutilation, it must be noted), Munny ceases firing when he hears the man's cries, and demands that his friends bring him a canteen of water, to ease the pain of a slow death. Unforgiven's absolute refusal to provide any easy answers or moral conclusions is what makes it so incredibly, undeniably powerful, and elevates into being a grand eulogy for Westerns overall, really. The whole affair has a timeless, mythical quality to it, no more so than in its masterful final shot, as Munny visits his wife's grave at sunset one last time, as the lone, sorrowful acoustic guitar of "Claudia's Theme" (written by Eastwood himself) begins playing, and the bookending text tells us:

"Some years later, Mrs. Feathers made the arduous journey to Hodgeman County to visit the final resting place of her only daughter. William Munny had long since disappeared with the children... some said to San Francisco, where it was rumored he attempted a living in dry goods. And there was nothing on the grave to explain to Mrs. Feathers why her only daughter had married a known thief and murderer, a man of notoriously violent and vicious disposition."
Final Score: 10
One of the few Best Picture winners I've seen which are actually worthy of serious praise. I don't have a whole lot to say on it, but that's mainly because most of your thoughts echo mine. Good write-up by the way!
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Re: Unforgiven (Eastwood, '92)

Post by Stu » Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:57 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:52 am
One of the few Best Picture winners I've seen which are actually worthy of serious praise. I don't have a whole lot to say on it, but that's mainly because most of your thoughts echo mine. Good write-up by the way!
Aw, thank you :oops: And the last time I remember us talking about it, you said you still hadn't seen it yet, so I'm glad you've finally watched and loved it since, by the way!
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Re: Unforgiven (Eastwood, '92)

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Mon Jun 10, 2019 5:01 am

Stu wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:57 am
Aw, thank you :oops: And the last time I remember us talking about it, you said you still hadn't seen it yet, so I'm glad you've finally watched and loved it since, by the way!
Now, I just have In Cold Blood to get to.
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Re: Unforgiven (Eastwood, '92)

Post by Stu » Mon Jun 10, 2019 5:06 am

Popcorn Reviews wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 5:01 am
Now, I just have In Cold Blood to get to.
Sweet 8-)
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Re: Unforgiven (Eastwood, '92)

Post by Thief » Mon Jun 10, 2019 1:50 pm

Stu wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:14 am
I don't currently have any new movie reviews to share here at the moment (although a number of them are still in progress), but, considering the fact that a number of current posters here weren't using this site before November of 2017, I figured it'd be a good time to re-post some of the greatest hits I'd written from before that point, starting with this write-up for Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven:
Image

It's a hell of a thing, killing a man; you take away everything he has, and everything he's ever gonna have.


Unforgiven is a film haunted by many things; as a movie, it's haunted by the cultural memory of a "moral" American West that never really existed, its main character, William Munny, is haunted by the memory of his late wife, by the atrocities he committed as a young outlaw, and by the fears he'll finally get what he deserves in the afterlife, and finally, one could argue Clint Eastwood himself was haunted, by the iconic shadows his cinematic mentors still cast over his career (Sergio Leone & Don Siegel to be exact, to whose memories the film is dedicated to). However, while Will Munny never truly escapes any of the demons haunting him, the man who portrayed him did, winning himself an Oscar for Best Director, in addition to the well-earned Best Picture Oscar the film itself received, earning it a richly-deserved status as a true modern classic.

From the first five minutes alone, it's obvious that Unforgiven is no traditional Western, when a scene of intercourse is interupted by a man slashing a prostitute's face for mocking his lack of endowment. When the local sheriff, "Little Bill" Daggett, gives the man and his friend rather light punishments, the women of the brothel conspire to offer a $1,000 "Wanted Dead" award on the two men, a catalyst that causes the notorious outlaw Will Munny to come out of "retirement". However, it's obvious from the very first moment we see him that Munny is no Man With No Name-style gunslinger; rather, he's a muddy, exhausted old man, struggling to wrangle his pigs, half of whom are sick anyway, into the pen of his small, meager farm. This demythologization of the Western outlaw continues throughout Unforgiven, as Munny gets pistol-whipped half to death, nearly dies from a fever, and, most importantly, is emotionally tortured by the memories of the past horrors he committed.

This demythologization extends to the tone and conventions of the overall Western genre as well, as the prostitutes are treated more like livestock than human beings here, the "action" scenes are realistically bloody and confused, with no exciting "quick-draw" duels in sight, and law enforcement isn't shown to be any more moral than the outlaws it opposes. Gene Hackman delivers a chillingly memorable performance as "Little" Bill, who, at first, seems like a reasonable, pragmatic man, but as the film goes on, he shows himself to be a brutal sadist, dealing mercilessly with anyone who threatens the "tranquility" of his town, often enjoying himself as he does so.

He's a man trying to achieve a good end through evil means, a moral ambiguity that extends to Will Munny as well, as it's obvious that he wouldn't have taken the job if he didn't have a family to support, he expresses constant, legitimate remorse over his past sins, and when he shoots one of the bountyheads in his gut (the one who had nothing to do the initial mutilation, it must be noted), Munny ceases firing when he hears the man's cries, and demands that his friends bring him a canteen of water, to ease the pain of a slow death. Unforgiven's absolute refusal to provide any easy answers or moral conclusions is what makes it so incredibly, undeniably powerful, and elevates into being a grand eulogy for Westerns overall, really. The whole affair has a timeless, mythical quality to it, no more so than in its masterful final shot, as Munny visits his wife's grave at sunset one last time, as the lone, sorrowful acoustic guitar of "Claudia's Theme" (written by Eastwood himself) begins playing, and the bookending text tells us:

"Some years later, Mrs. Feathers made the arduous journey to Hodgeman County to visit the final resting place of her only daughter. William Munny had long since disappeared with the children... some said to San Francisco, where it was rumored he attempted a living in dry goods. And there was nothing on the grave to explain to Mrs. Feathers why her only daughter had married a known thief and murderer, a man of notoriously violent and vicious disposition."
Final Score: 10
Such a great film, and a great review.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:19 pm

John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum

Way too much themespeak, and by the end I felt more exhausted than invigorated, but there's still enough inspiration in this series (and enough creative violence, delivered with clarity and tension) that I'm curious to see what happens next. But maybe they should wrap it up with Episode 4. Weirdly, the film might peak 10 minutes in with a hilarious knife fight, though Halle Berry displays her spinoff potential with a satisfying video-gamey gunfight in a bazaar. And all the touches of Hell are nice. This is a film loaded with fireplaces and furnaces, and Berry and her dogs give off a Persephone / Cerberus vibe.
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The above-written is wholly and solely the perspective of DaMU and should not be taken as an effort to rile, malign, or diminish you, dummo.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Captain Terror » Mon Jun 10, 2019 6:47 pm

Wooley wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:39 am
I dunno man, I have felt that most of the X-Men movies were pretty poor so I skipped Apocalypse altogether and nothing I saw about this one led me to believe it was going to be any better so it's less a matter of abysmal reviews making me skeptical and more a matter of me being utterly skeptical to begin with and needing great reviews for me to even consider it.
This is basically my position as well. Despite my ever-diminishing interest in the series I saw Apocalypse at a theater, mostly out of a sense of duty I guess, and that pretty much ended my enthusiasm for this cast. The fact that there's yet another film, one based on a story we've already seen no less, isn't exciting to me. It never even occurred to me to check the Tomatometer, such was my disinterest, so it's not like I was influenced by bad reviews. I'm ready for a reboot.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Wed Jun 12, 2019 12:13 pm

Chungking Express - 7/10
If I am the Phantom, it is because man's hatred has made me so. If I shall be saved, it will be because your love redeems me.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Wed Jun 12, 2019 4:56 pm

The Station Agent - 9/10 - I ran across this and remembered how much I liked it. So I DVR'd it and then started having second thoughts. At this point I try not to devote too much time to re-watching movies. No matter how much I enjoyed them and regardless of how long it's been because there are way too many that I haven't seen. But I decided to catch a few minutes to kill some time and quickly realized how good it is. The very definition of indie with it's small (no pun intended) cast and modest focus. The three leads, Peter Dinklage, Bobby Cannavale and Patricia Clarkson, are note perfect with Michelle Williams, John Slattery and Joe Lo Truglio in smaller roles. Tom McCarthy does a great job both as director and writer and is responsible for two other of my personal favorites Win Win and The Visitor. A quiet, unpretentious movie and well worth watching.

I also tried watching Fellini's Satyricon but couldn't hack it. So my list of watched Fellini films is still at four and holding.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Wed Jun 12, 2019 8:59 pm

Our House - 5/10 - This starts out okay as Thomas Mann (Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, Kong: Skull Island) plays the older brother in a family of three orphaned children. He's got a scientific bent and is working on a personal project involving wireless electricity when his parents are killed in a car accident. It's enough of an intriguing premise to keep the viewer's attention engaged. But then inexplicable things start happening in their home and a
supernatural element
is introduced. By the time the third act rolls around the movie has
unfortunately turned into a totally generic evil ghost story.
Starts out promising enough but sort of peters out at the end. Still worth a watch under the right circumstances.
My heart is still and awaits its hour.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Captain Terror » Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:07 am

Captain Terror wrote:
Mon Jun 10, 2019 6:47 pm
This is basically my position as well. Despite my ever-diminishing interest in the series I saw Apocalypse at a theater, mostly out of a sense of duty I guess, and that pretty much ended my enthusiasm for this cast. The fact that there's yet another film, one based on a story we've already seen no less, isn't exciting to me. It never even occurred to me to check the Tomatometer, such was my disinterest, so it's not like I was influenced by bad reviews. I'm ready for a reboot.
So a mere two days after this post I was coerced into seeing Dark Phoenix and actually sort of liked it. It's a much better version of the Phoenix story than Last Stand was (no big accomplishment, granted). The stakes were more personal than the average superhero film, so the inevitable explosions at the end actually meant something to me. Sophie Turner hasn't made much of an impression on me over the years, but she's pretty good here. Also the film is brief by comic book movie standards, and it moves along at a brisk pace. (And on a superficial level I enjoyed the Beast action, as he was a childhood favorite of mine). So I'm still ready for a reboot, but I'm glad we ended things on this note.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:12 am

Captain Terror wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:07 am
So a mere two days after this post I was coerced into seeing Dark Phoenix and actually sort of liked it. It's a much better version of the Phoenix story than Last Stand was (no big accomplishment, granted). The stakes were more personal than the average superhero film, so the inevitable explosions at the end actually meant something to me. Sophie Turner hasn't made much of an impression on me over the years, but she's pretty good here. Also the film is brief by comic book movie standards, and it moves along at a brisk pace. (And on a superficial level I enjoyed the Beast action, as he was a childhood favorite of mine). So I'm still ready for a reboot, but I'm glad we ended things on this note.

One of us!


Anyone seen Borgman? I kinda loved it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by crumbsroom » Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:15 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:12 am

Anyone seen Borgman? I kinda loved it.
Yes. A couple of times. It's great.

Would make a good double bill with Teorema.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:27 am

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:12 am
Anyone seen Borgman? I kinda loved it.
I'm a fan. The end didn't really nail it for me, but otherwise I'm about it. I make it a point now when I'm a guest to strip naked and crouch on my host's chest while they sleep.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Thu Jun 13, 2019 6:31 am

Crummy, there was something I watched recently that claimed to be heavily influenced by Teorema and it, though I cannot remember what it was for the life of me, combined with my watching of Salo, piqued my interest in the film. This only adds to it.

Ergill, I responded strongly to the film due to how that has always been my habit. I descended upon the Earth to strengthen my ranks, after all.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Captain Terror » Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:48 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:12 am
One of us!
I agree with your Letterboxd review, the critical ire seems misplaced here, even if this is only mid-tier superhero fare.
And as a fella of a certain age,
the Dazzler cameo
gave me a chuckle.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Slentert » Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:56 pm

ThatDarnMKS wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:12 am
Anyone seen Borgman? I kinda loved it.
Fantastic film. I found Abel and The Northerners by the same director to be equally fascinating. Especially the latter one is one of my favorite movies, though I noticed on Letterboxd that a lot of Americans find the movie to be 'too Dutch' for their taste. (I'm from the Dutch part of Belgium, so that's close enough.)
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Slentert » Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:00 pm

Death Proof wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 12:13 pm
Chungking Express - 7/10
One of my all-time favorite movies, top 5 material in fact (this summer I'll be able to see it on 35mm, really excited about that)

Kind of astonished that you gave it a 7/10. To me it seems like the kind of movie you either completely love or find absolutely off-putting, so I'm surprised that your response is kind of in the middle.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:34 pm

Slentert wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:00 pm
One of my all-time favorite movies, top 5 material in fact (this summer I'll be able to see it on 35mm, really excited about that)

Kind of astonished that you gave it a 7/10. To me it seems like the kind of movie you either completely love or find absolutely off-putting, so I'm surprised that your response is kind of in the middle.
Let me see if I can properly describe my viewpoint...

The first half was amazing. Great tension. But it felt like the writer ran out of ideas and decided to slap on the second story instead of making the entire movie about the first story.

The second story was... irritating? Don't know if that's the right word, but the shift in tone from a story about a drug dealer and the cop chasing her to some ditzy snowflake breaking into her cop friend's apartment felt uneven and out of place.

Does that make sense?
If I am the Phantom, it is because man's hatred has made me so. If I shall be saved, it will be because your love redeems me.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:49 pm

Death Proof wrote:
Wed Jun 12, 2019 12:13 pm
Chungking Express - 7/10
I think I went to like 9 on this one. One of my favorite "Foreign Language Films", I think.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:56 pm

Got halfway through Arachnophobia the other day before my internet crapped out, enjoyed what I saw. Best element: the flick really takes its time. The jungle adventure at the beginning has its own beginning/middle/end, some real atmosphere, and the juicy B-movie pleasure of that spider working like a cheap puppet. And then the flick gives us time to get to know Jeff Daniels and his family! It's a weird thing, to see a film like this take itself somewhat seriously and trust in the viewer's patience. Respect.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Oxnard Montalvo » Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:33 pm

maaaaan, nobody watches Wong Kar-Wai for the plot.
(I was gonna say something but not everything is for everyone)
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Thu Jun 13, 2019 5:11 pm

DaMU wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:56 pm
Got halfway through Arachnophobia the other day before my internet crapped out, enjoyed what I saw. Best element: the flick really takes its time. The jungle adventure at the beginning has its own beginning/middle/end, some real atmosphere, and the juicy B-movie pleasure of that spider working like a cheap puppet. And then the flick gives us time to get to know Jeff Daniels and his family! It's a weird thing, to see a film like this take itself somewhat seriously and trust in the viewer's patience. Respect.
John Goodman rocks that shit.
If I am the Phantom, it is because man's hatred has made me so. If I shall be saved, it will be because your love redeems me.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Thu Jun 13, 2019 5:17 pm

DaMU wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:56 pm
Got halfway through Arachnophobia the other day before my internet crapped out, enjoyed what I saw. Best element: the flick really takes its time. The jungle adventure at the beginning has its own beginning/middle/end, some real atmosphere, and the juicy B-movie pleasure of that spider working like a cheap puppet. And then the flick gives us time to get to know Jeff Daniels and his family! It's a weird thing, to see a film like this take itself somewhat seriously and trust in the viewer's patience. Respect.
Oh you gotta finish it.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Thu Jun 13, 2019 5:58 pm

Slentert wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:00 pm
One of my all-time favorite movies, top 5 material in fact (this summer I'll be able to see it on 35mm, really excited about that)

Kind of astonished that you gave it a 7/10. To me it seems like the kind of movie you either completely love or find absolutely off-putting, so I'm surprised that your response is kind of in the middle.
Same. If I could only pick two films to watch for the rest of my life, Chungking Express would be one of them.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Bandy Greensacks » Thu Jun 13, 2019 8:39 pm

I personally liked Fallen Angels and In the Mood for Love a lot more than Chungking Express. Can't really remember why.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Macrology » Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:30 pm

Picking your favorite Wong Kar-Wai film is like splitting hairs. They exist in kind of a continuum (this feels especially true of Chungking Express and Fallen Angels, which were originally conceived as one film). If I prefer Chungking Express, it's because the film is about renewal and hope and possibility, and it's the most beautiful encapsulation of all those feelings that I've seen in one film.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri Jun 14, 2019 12:22 am

Macrology wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 11:30 pm
Picking your favorite Wong Kar-Wai film is like splitting hairs. They exist in kind of a continuum (this feels especially true of Chungking Express and Fallen Angels, which were originally conceived as one film). If I prefer Chungking Express, it's because the film is about renewal and hope and possibility, and it's the most beautiful encapsulation of all those feelings that I've seen in one film.
I feel like Ashes of Time Redux, the Grandmaster and My Blueberry Nights (which I just watched today) sit comfortably at the bottom of his filmography. They're still very good but they lack the sublime magic that the majority of his output contains.

I always vacillate between Chungking Express and In the Mood for Love for favorites but 2049 likely had the strongest emotional reaction and I think Happy Together is the most poignant tale of gay love and loss that I've seen. Days of Being Wild sits comfortably in the middle.

I need to see As Tears Go By.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Ergill » Fri Jun 14, 2019 3:14 am

I think DP's right that there's a clash going on in Chungking Express (same for Fallen Angels), but it's a clash I happen to like. Even in the segment he's partial to, you've got these disparate people living out different genres (romantic comedy and noir), and part of the fun is the weird friction between these styles crashing into each other.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Slentert » Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:44 am

Ergill wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 3:14 am
I think DP's right that there's a clash going on in Chungking Express (same for Fallen Angels), but it's a clash I happen to like. Even in the segment he's partial to, you've got these disparate people living out different genres (romantic comedy and noir), and part of the fun is the weird friction between these styles crashing into each other.
Agreed, I wasn't trying to put DP on a blast, I think many people would have this reaction towards the movie. Chungking Express has a peculiar vibe, either you roll with it or you don't.

I have seen only 3 Wong-Kar Wai films (CE, Happy Together and Fallen Angels) and I noticed that all those movies feature rather extreme emotions, that express themselves in a very stylish fashion. I think a lot of people would find that off-putting (and I wouldn't blame them). I love it though.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Fri Jun 14, 2019 10:28 am

Ergill wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 3:14 am
I think DP's right that there's a clash going on in Chungking Express (same for Fallen Angels), but it's a clash I happen to like. Even in the segment he's partial to, you've got these disparate people living out different genres (romantic comedy and noir), and part of the fun is the weird friction between these styles crashing into each other.
This is due to Wong's filmmaking philosophy and his post-modern rejection of the "grand narrative." While I can't speak to As Tears Gone By, this emphasis on the collective experience has been present at least since Days of Living Wild in which he ends the film with...
A never introduced character played by Tony Leung as he gets ready to go out. This is apparently the character he plays in both In the Mood for Love and 2049 but Wong uses him as the Coda to a completely unrelated narrative.
Virtually all his films are about the way our lives are interrupted by the lives of others and their own narrative. It creates a fragmented cinematic narrative that seeks largely to highlight specific, intimate moments and feelings rather than a traditional "plot."

Sorry for the ramble. I awoke with a headache and you got me thinking about why I love Wong Kar Wai.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Fri Jun 14, 2019 4:27 pm

I had forgotten that Stephen King had written a sequel of sorts to The Shining titled Doctor Sleep. And now the first trailer for the movie adaptation has dropped. Ewan McGregor stars as a a grown Danny Torrance. Haven't read the book but given that it's tied into one of the most meaningful and influential pop culture touchstones of the last half century this is significant. Right?

My heart is still and awaits its hour.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:34 pm

Wooley wrote:
Thu Jun 13, 2019 5:17 pm
Oh you gotta finish it.
Finished! It was fun, it kept my interest and investment the whole way through, Jeff Daniels keeps the daffy premise emotionally plausible and actually earns the really obvious callback at the end of the film to his inciting trauma as a child. I was wondering how the film would hold my interest since actual-sized spiders aren't the most compelling of film presences, but the extreme close-ups do a lot, some of the shot/reverse moments are hilarious in how they make us buy into the spiders having intentional goals, and most fun of all is how nearly all of the spider attacks are (a) the spider goes somewhere where you know a person's gonna be soon, (b) the person waits a bit then decides it's time to go to that place and do the thing, and (c) we wait with dread for the spider to bite them. It's obvious construction, basically a series of sick jokes, but goddamn if the flick doesn't pull it off.

Given that this was directed by Frank Marshall, I'm tempted to give Congo another watch and see if there are craft virtues I missed watching it as a kid (it's a dumb movie but a fun one IIRC, and I do remember the gray gorillas being creepy).
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Patrick McGroin » Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:09 am

DaMU wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:34 pm
...I'm tempted to give Congo another watch and see if there are craft virtues I missed watching it as a kid.
Ernie Hudson channeling Clark Gable and Tim Curry's outrageous accent. It's been years but that's what I remember best.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Rock » Sat Jun 15, 2019 12:14 am

"Stop eating my sesame cake!"
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Thief » Sat Jun 15, 2019 2:25 pm

DaMU wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:34 pm
Given that this was directed by Frank Marshall, I'm tempted to give Congo another watch and see if there are craft virtues I missed watching it as a kid (it's a dumb movie but a fun one IIRC, and I do remember the gray gorillas being creepy).
I've probably said it a thousand times here or at RT, but this was one of my most disappointing film experiences. Having read and loved the book, I was pumped when I found out there was a film coming out. But oh, my, what a piece of crap it was.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sat Jun 15, 2019 2:30 pm

A few minutes after Arachnophobia ended, I started watching Eight Legged Freaks. Lotta nostalgia for that one. It's a slight movie and probably worse than Arachnophobia, but it's got that fun cheesy B-movie vibe. You got your mad scientist, your radioactive waste, your plucky kid, the surprisingly careful escalation of spider attacks. Best of all, the spiders chirp and squeal and double-take with some of the same spirit of the first Gremlins monsters (if not the same amount of personality). Have a real affection for these kinds of creature feature family-mostly-friendly horror-coms. Tremors is another. Grabbers is a bit more adult but still has that semi-satirical angle. It's a hard needle to thread, so even when the results are a more mild success, like Eight Legged Freaks, I still come away impressed.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by DaMU » Sat Jun 15, 2019 2:36 pm

Also, Scarjo has the best bits. When her younger brother wants to use the phone, she says dryly, "Why? You don't have any friends." And after she tasers her boyfriend for coming on too strong, she's frustrated mostly because it means her mother was right, and, "Do you know how embarrassing that is?"

Again, mild. But charming.

[Her room is full of posters for bands like Linkin Park and P.O.D., which is both on-brand for a teenager in the early 2000s and hilariously transparent Warner Bros cross-promotion.]
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sat Jun 15, 2019 5:19 pm

Thief wrote:
Sat Jun 15, 2019 2:25 pm
I've probably said it a thousand times here or at RT, but this was one of my most disappointing film experiences. Having read and loved the book, I was pumped when I found out there was a film coming out. But oh, my, what a piece of crap it was.
I agree with you completely.
The book was so good. The movie is awful.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Sat Jun 15, 2019 5:20 pm

DaMU wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:34 pm
Finished! It was fun, it kept my interest and investment the whole way through, Jeff Daniels keeps the daffy premise emotionally plausible and actually earns the really obvious callback at the end of the film to his inciting trauma as a child. I was wondering how the film would hold my interest since actual-sized spiders aren't the most compelling of film presences, but the extreme close-ups do a lot, some of the shot/reverse moments are hilarious in how they make us buy into the spiders having intentional goals, and most fun of all is how nearly all of the spider attacks are (a) the spider goes somewhere where you know a person's gonna be soon, (b) the person waits a bit then decides it's time to go to that place and do the thing, and (c) we wait with dread for the spider to bite them. It's obvious construction, basically a series of sick jokes, but goddamn if the flick doesn't pull it off.
I'm really glad you enjoyed it, that's pretty much the exact reaction I had.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Death Proof » Sun Jun 16, 2019 8:58 pm

Rocketman (2019) - 9/10
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Wooley » Tue Jun 18, 2019 2:46 am

Wow.
Glass was really not very good.
After The Visit and Split, I was convinced Shyamalan had his mojo back.
Yikes.
I wonder if I'll be able to fully enjoy Unbreakable again.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by Popcorn Reviews » Tue Jun 18, 2019 3:04 am

Wooley wrote:
Tue Jun 18, 2019 2:46 am
Wow.
Glass was really not very good.
After The Visit and Split, I was convinced Shyamalan had his mojo back.
Yikes.
I wonder if I'll be able to fully enjoy Unbreakable again.
To be fair, the script for Split was written back when he was at his prime with The Sixth Sense/Unbreakable, so I wasn't entirely convinced he was truly back yet.
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Re: Recently Seen

Post by ThatDarnMKS » Tue Jun 18, 2019 3:20 am

I really liked Glass. It felt like a great 3 hour film cut down to a messy 2 hr one
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Re: The Bourne Supremacy (Greengrass, '04)

Post by Stu » Wed Jun 19, 2019 4:42 am

Another re-post of an old review, this time my one of The Bourne Supremacy:

Image

-He's making his first mistake.
-It's not a mistake; they don't make mistakes, they don't do "random". There's always an objective, always a target.
-The targets always came from us, who's giving them to him now?
-The scary version? He is.

The Bourne Supremacy has always been my favorite out of the original trilogy of films, and a much stronger effort than the rather tepid original, as a result of series-newcomer Paul Greengrass finding a near-perfect balance for his distinctively visceral storytelling, while Tony Gilroy's screenplay brings in an unexpected, understated focus on character and pathos, resulting in what I can only describe as one of the best action movies of the new millennium. Ironically, compared to other action movies, Supremacy really doesn't have all that much er, ACTION in it; there's one brutally drawn out fight-to-the-death about halfway through, and one of the best car chases in recent memory during the climax, but besides those, there really isn't any other major action in the movie. This may concern you initially, but Greengrass doesn't need any mindless violence to keep our interest, rather, utilizing raw storytelling energy in order to keep the tension piano wire-tight. He's always keeping the plot moving along in a concise, ruthless fashion, never pausing for breath unless it suits the scene, almost always having something of relevance happening or developing.

He doesn't bother holding our hands or trying to force us a step ahead of events, rather, letting us discover new information ONLY as the characters themselves do, always having us see things from their perspective exclusively, which combines with the film's atmosphere of paranoia, intrigue, and conspiracy to make us feel like we ourselves are constantly being hunted. This movie's like a tiger shark in this, in that it never, ever stops moving, and I couldn't be more thankful for that. But, another major factor that distingushes TBS is how unexpectedly personal it feels; unlike the first film, where Bourne was just a lost, confused amnesiac, he has a much more immediate motivater this time around, after the murder of his girlfriend, Marie. This is what brings him out of hiding, but her death doesn't just serve as some generic story catalyst like it would in other movies, as her memory lingers within him, with him remembering the way she wanted him to move on from his old life of death.

This is why Bourne only seeks justice for her murder, rather than revenge, and the various ways Bourne struggles to honor Marie's wishes throughout the film adds a lot, whether it be his refusal to kill the men responsible for her death, even in self-defense (although he still brings them to justice in other ways), or finding the time while on the run to track down the orphan of his first victims, so he can tell her he's sorry, and that he now understand what it it feels like to lose someone. However, if that sounds overly sentimental in theory, it doesn't in practice, as Greengrass tackles it with the same level of craft he does everything else, keeping it in balance with all the other elements that he so expertly juggles here. As I said before, The Bourne Supremacy is overall an unusually intelligent, efficient, and focused spy thriller, and again, as far as I'm concerned, is one of the best action films of its decade; "Bourne again" indeed!
Final Score: 9
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