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 Das and Beau's excellent digital adventures 
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It's been in the oven for a bit, but it's here finally - Me and Beau share a pretty big fondness for video games, Naturally the inclination was to make a thread with a list, but not just any lists, these lists have been so carefully considered you just have to play them all to understand the fondness for the games within.. you know, like every other list of favorites. 25 games we call favorites, 2 people you know you love (we hope.), let's go.


Das
25. Silent Hill 3
24. Mirror's Edge
23. Diablo
22. Age of Empires
21. Street Fighter III: Third Strike
20. Pathologic
19. Okami
18. Quake 3: Arena
17. Baldur's Gate 2: Shadows of Amn
16. King of Fighters 1998
15. Crysis

Beau
25. VVVVV
24. Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest
23. Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King
22. Passage
21. Cave Story+
20. Beneath a Steel Sky
19. Digital A Love Story
18. A Mind forever Voyaging


Sat Oct 05, 2013 10:51 am
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Cool, I know virtually nothing about video games that aren't named Rock Band or FIFA.

I beat GTA3 and the first Metal Gear Solid back in the day?!


Sat Oct 05, 2013 11:07 am
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Sat Oct 05, 2013 11:10 am
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looking forward to the exegesis on T&C Surf Designs


Sat Oct 05, 2013 11:12 am
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Post 25. Silent Hill 3

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[2003/Team Silent & Konami/ PS2, PC]
“Monsters? They looked like monsters to you?”

Consider Silent Hill 3. It isn't the first “mature” horror narrative in games and it wasn't the last. But it's probably the best, even 11 years later. Often overlooked, as both 1 and 2 contain more jarring and forceful narrative devices, the third Silent Hill is the peak of the series, narratively, while never as overtly shocking as its predecessors. It uses narrative to work out the edges of the mysterious little city of Silent Hill, while intertwining its back-story into the first game's events with a degree of patience and space unique to games. The narrative, while hugely important, resists the typically modern habit of locking the player into short bursts of guided gameplay. Silent Hill 3's levels are mazes of locked doors, oppressive enemies and puzzles, nearly all of which feed back into the narrative. Consider the game's first major puzzle: to advance, one must re-order the works of Shakespeare. Nearly all them contain elements of sacrifice and betrayal from within the family, and none of this is unintentional. The game's environments, especially the shifted environments, are rich with a gruesome but important psychological meaning. Each level and obstacle within the game feeds back into the game's narrative elements.

Beyond that, there's the simple impact of the game's elements: the steady, ever-building hiss of radio static telling the player, “It's near you, it's always near you.” While Resident Evil was, at the end of the day, about surprise, Silent Hill was always about suffocating dread, about removing hope, removing safety from every corner and room in the game. You are never not fragile. Your weapons will always feel flimsy in the arms of Heather. Her swing of an iron bar looks flimsy, because it will always be the flimsy swing of an untrained 20-something young woman. The sound and the areas often feel gray and unwelcoming before transitioning into the vivid, rusted, bloody nightmare worlds the series is most famous for. The sound is already an unsettling mixture of inhuman sighs and static distortion, doubly so when the game flips the switch on its world, and then the real dread settles in. This isn't horror through shock or cliché, it's horror through narrative, through mechanics, and, most importantly, through the very design of its world. Silent Hill always puts you in the position of a normal person, never an ex-combatant or a superman, and then subjects that person to a world that defies logic and sanity. It's often said, though it’s rarely true, that they don't make them like this anymore. But in Silent Hill 3's case, it's absolutely true.


Sat Oct 05, 2013 11:14 am
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Post Re: Das and Beau's excellent digital adventures

Good start from Das; now to see if Beau can match it...

Hint: he will.

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 11:34 am
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yikes, this is terrible. i can't completely ignore video games anymore then :(?

:fresh:

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 11:45 am
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Side-note: Beau probably won't chime in until Sunday when he's not busy.

Smalley, this isn't a competition.

But yes, you can no longer ignore those damnable video games, charu.


Sat Oct 05, 2013 11:56 am
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Neat.

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 11:59 am
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Love this.

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 12:20 pm
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Post 24. Mirror's Edge

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[2008-2009/DICE EA/PC, Xbox 360, Ps3]
“Sooner or later, you have to jump.“

Mirror's Edge, despite being relatively linear, is the unique sort of single-player action/linear first-person game that opens up upon repeated playthroughs. The thesis of the game is built upon the most fluid navigation of environments by jumping, swinging, and running. It's a game that’s similar to the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis Sonics, grasping the joy of movement and speed. The more you play, the more gracefully and fluidly you can work through each of the game's levels – as your understanding of the game's unique visual language and peculiarities grows – until it's not so much about getting through but about mastering the fastest route. A deathless speed run through Mirror's Edge is one of the more exhilarating game experiences I’ve had, and it's the basis for the game's place on this list. The initial impression, that the game is a beautiful but flawed idea that could be built upon further, is not inherently an incorrect one. But that DICE made such a visually unique and singular game merits a further look, if one doubts the game's pedigree.

In each aspect, the game feels worked over and tuned to guide and make movement as fluid as it can be in a first-person yet highly physical space. It is unique for featuring the body of its player-character so frequently, when in some of the game's spiritual predecessors, particularly the rocket-jumping antics of the Quake and Doom series, you were rarely seen as more than a pair of hands on a gun. But the sensation, the inertia of picking up movement is similar, while not exactly the same. The thing that kept me going back to Mirror's Edge was that it really hadn't been since the days of Quake 3's lightning fast death-matches that moving had felt quite so wonderful in a game to me. That the game is almost timelessly gorgeous – and will probably remain an impressive aesthetic spectacle for quite a long time – is just a nice added bonus. The game's combat is the one bump, but it's so frequently avoided altogether in the runs of the game I've accumulated over the years, that I'd be lying if I said I didn't just move right past nearly every encounter altogether. Mirror's Edge is absolutely one of the crown jewels of what will soon be last generation. Such a shame that no game since has successfully provided the same joy of movement.


Sat Oct 05, 2013 12:28 pm
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whoa whoa slow down, I expect to be able to attain each game and play it through before each new entry kthnx

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 12:29 pm
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I'm done for the day.

Now get working on those speed running skills then, Trip.


Sat Oct 05, 2013 12:35 pm
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Trip do you not own Mirror's Edge? If not I can hook you up.

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 12:36 pm
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No but I can just get it off TPB I'm sure.

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 12:37 pm
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I'm glad Mirror's Edge exists because it's a game where player enjoyment is firmly anchored to player skill, which is something the industry is moving away from. Like you say, the game's all about the abstract 'feel' of movement; it's about reaching that zone where the barrier between your hands and the character on screen are obliterated, where the avatar on screen is an extension of yourself. Bad players will rarely reach that zone, whereas good players will only ever be in that zone (until they enter combat, which exists only to knock you out of that zone for reasons that are unknown to everyone on the planet, including the people that made the game). It doesn't adhere to the law of diminishing returns; the more time you invest into mastering the mechanics, the more enjoyment you'll get out of it.

Good start to the thread, looking forward to the rest.

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 1:13 pm
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I enjoyed Mirror's Edge from what I played from it. I had to run it on mixed settings so never finished it but I get a new comp it'll be the first game I finish. Well beside HL2.


Sat Oct 05, 2013 1:26 pm
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charulata wrote:
yikes, this is terrible. i can't completely ignore video games anymore then :(?

:fresh:

videogames arent for girls

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 2:39 pm
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Beau the ghost-writer?

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 2:43 pm
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^ Lol..

Cool thread guys. I'm subscribed. Not an video game expert, but I used to be geeky about RPGs in my youth. Hope to see some of those. Don't know much about action games or anything else.

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 5:09 pm
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rad wrote:
videogames arent for girls


just not true :roll:

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 5:10 pm
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Izzy Black wrote:

just not true :roll:

i wasnt being serious i thought my no caps limited punctuation style made it clear that i'm just clownin' around w. my buds

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 5:19 pm
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sorry :oops:

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 5:20 pm
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Don't believe him, Izzy, rad is a known misogynist.

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 5:22 pm
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lol

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 5:22 pm
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whats wrong w/ being misogynexy

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 5:22 pm
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Well, it's probably a good way to enjoy movies. There's a lot of them out there. :D

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Sat Oct 05, 2013 5:24 pm
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Post 23. Diablo

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[1996/Blizzard & Sierra/PC]
"Not even death can save you from me."

Diablo is a central part of my late elementary school experience. It's, among other things, one of the first multiplayer games I ever played online and it served as the real gateway to PC gaming for me. In most senses a piece of media can be personally important to someone, Diablo is to me. In a way, I don't think there's a way I can make this list without this game on it. Certainly, I've played games that have affected me more, but this is the one that transcended PS1 platformers and the occasional adventure game on my dad's computer. It allowed video games to become nothing short of an obsession.

In Diablo and its expansion, Hellfire, I have probably put in more than 1000 hours. The game itself is the real genesis of the grind game, a raw, stripped-back piece of design that importantly and gracefully paired gleeful carnage, progression, and finding shiny new items with a social experience that has certainly, in my case, forged some of my greatest friendships. All because of this glorified skinner's box. It certainly does very little to disguise this, but ultimately, that the point of Diablo is to keep you playing Diablo doesn't matter, because, for what it is, Diablo is the master class and genesis of the modern dungeon crawler, an unfussy and endlessly enjoyable cycle you end up repeating many, many times.


Sun Oct 06, 2013 1:37 am
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For me the best game ever was Counterstrike because I never used a mic and that game allowed me to rush and die in the first 20 seconds and then make jokes for the remainder of each round. Also sometimes staying alive and taunting people. Video games, like all things in life, are merely there to provide a context for making jokes. If you haven't figured this out, your life is meaningless.

Diablo was good for this, too, though, because you could let your teammates die and then taunt them and laugh when they got really upset. Especially when you attack them to low HP and then don't kill them so that they die and drop their stuff. Such a great game. For comedy.

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Sun Oct 06, 2013 3:23 pm
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Runescape's permanent gear loss in the Wilderness seems more your style than Diablo, LEAVES. You get to make them mad in chat, kill them, steal the gear they worked hard for, then put it on sale at the auction house for obnoxiously low, game economy destroying prices.

The maximum comedy.


Sun Oct 06, 2013 4:51 pm
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Das wrote:
Runescape's permanent gear loss in the Wilderness seems more your style than Diablo, LEAVES. You get to make them mad in chat, kill them, steal the gear they worked hard for, then put it on sale at the auction house for obnoxiously low, game economy destroying prices.

The maximum comedy.
Yeah, but I had a roommate who played that game which had fewer pixels on the screen at any given time than the weeks of in-game-time he had put into it, and it made me sad. There's something inherently life-destroying about MMORPGs that makes all the comedy so very tragic and dour.

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Sun Oct 06, 2013 5:53 pm
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I'm reading. I'm always on the lookout for good scary games to play for 10 minutes and then never have the nerve to play more of because I'm a scared little baby, so Silent Hill 3 sounds perfect.

I've expressed my adoration for Mirror's Edge on here plenty of times. So I'm glad to see it on a list like this.

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Sun Oct 06, 2013 9:24 pm
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The real comedy of MMORPGs happens in guilds when one guy clearly out-nerds the other nerds.

Sometimes I miss WoW a little.

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Sun Oct 06, 2013 11:21 pm
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Never played Diablo.

Or Silent Hill 3 for that matter. I have the PS2 collection which includes 2, 3 and 4 but I've only completed 2 - and 2 is probably one of my favourite games ever, going off the memories I have of it scaring the crap out of me during late-night sessions. Seems strange that I never advanced to the third instalment. Will rectify that soon, hopefully.

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Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:18 am
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25. VVVVVV (Terry Cavanagh, Windows PC, 2010)

Side-scrolling platformers have seen a resurgence these past ten years. There are many reasons for this. One of them is nostalgia: many current developers belong to the first generation that discovered videogames through Super Mario Brothers on the Nintendo. The genre appeals to them because it was the first they fell in love with. One recent title, Braid, took advantage of this association, referencing classic sidescrollers, specifically Mario, in order to contribute to the game’s toy chest atmosphere, which in turn contributed to the main theme: the retreat into memory, the bittersweet scent of the past, the search for lost time. Another reason for the resurgence is economy. The tools became available for indie developers to cheaply make, if not expensive three-dimensional epics, at least two-dimensional adventures similar in style and complexity to the old Super Nintendo masterpieces. And since they were cheap and built by one or two artists, these indie titles could also be more personal and interesting, since they did not have the pressures of ballooning production costs forcing them to appeal to mass markets.

VVVVVV is one of the best of the current crop of platformers. Many other titles almost made this list, but I finally chose Terry Cavanagh’s hilarious, frenetic romp, because it combines exciting and exacting gameplay with tight, beautiful level design, inspired by another genre that has seen a contemporary resurgence, the action-adventure Metroidvania, with its labyrinthine world and multiple non-linear paths. Other indie platformers almost replaced it – including the soulful, moody Knytt and the elegant, challenging N – but I chose VVVVVV for its surreal beauty. From Cavanagh, I’ve also played his freeware Judith, a reinterpretation of the Bluebeard tale with very crude First Person graphics, reminiscent of the initial entries into that genre. What struck me about Judith was how Cavanagh was able to use these supposedly dated visuals for expressive means: to build an uncanny, unworldly atmosphere through an obviously unrealistic, flat environment, at once a space you live in and a space that is clearly fake and problematic.

Cavanagh does it again in VVVVVV. On the one hand, as he has admitted, the aesthetic is an attempt to indulge in his “retro-fetish,” harkening back to the Commodore 64 games he grew up with, like Monty on the Run and Dizzy. But there is also something else, a productive use of retro visuals to evoke a mood. The bright pixel graphics veer towards simple and iconic forms, a kind of old-fashioned futurism that refers back, not only to old computer games, but also to old green-on-black computer displays. Such as it is, the story is nonsense: something about a spaceship and its crew being sucked into another dimension. What is important, here, is that this other dimension is, simply, computer-land, a kind of computer-land gone haywire where the words YES, TRUTH, and STOP are recast as ping-ponging obstacles. And, like most platformers, VVVVVV is about the freedom of movement, jumping and, in this case, gravity-flipping over an environment and, more abstractly, through the mechanics of the game code. Understanding how everything works and how objects behave with and around your in-game avatar is not simply an important objective, but a problem that you cannot ever ignore, because, quite literally, every step depends on your mastery of mechanics. Few genres pit you against the stuff videogames are made of so relentlessly. This makes VVVVVV deliciously self-referential: the ridiculous premise, the computerphilic design, and the demanding platforming combine to produce a gamey game about gaming, at once familiarly retro and cheekily odd.


Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:17 am
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Welcome aboard, Beau.

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Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:32 am
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24. Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (Rareware, 1995, Super Nintendo)

The Donkey Kong Country games for the Super Nintendo were meant to be technological showcases, and to this day, they still look beautiful. In 1994, two 32-bit consoles were released, Sega’s Saturn and Sony’s Playstation, and Nintendo would not properly respond until 1996, with its Nintendo 64. Meanwhile – and putting aside the infamous introduction of the Virtual Boy in 1995 – the company stuck with its 16-bit Super Nintendo, and undoubtedly, one of the reasons it was able to do that was the Donkey Kong Country franchise, which managed to impress graphically despite competing next generation hardware. Indeed, when the game was first showcased, many thought that it was in fact an early demo for Project Reality, what would later become the Nintendo 64. When these same people heard it was actually an imminent Super Nintendo release, they were stunned. I was stunned, too, when I first saw it on a television in an Argentine videogame store. It was obvious to me that this mesmerizing killer app was a graphical leap from Super Mario World, the console’s most popular and fondly remembered platformer. And that it was all happening on the Super Nintendo, which had been in existence since 1990, was unbelievable.

Rareware’s UK-based development team rendered, modeled, and animated characters and backgrounds with 3D Silicon Graphics technology, and then converted the results into 2D. Because of memory constraints, parts of this conversion were quite creative: background elements had to be repeated in order save memory, so these were cut-and-pasted in various patterns so as to add variety and mask the repetition. Donkey Kong, as a character, had been basically unexplored since 1981’s arcade Donkey Kong, in which he played the villain guarding the damsel in distress. So, when Nintendo gave Rareware the IP, the latter were free to invent a world for the character. This meant, also, that they could create a sidekick, the nimble Diddy Kong, who became the star of the franchise’s crowning achievement, Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy’s Kong Quest. This sequel, in turn, added another character, Dixie Kong, Diddy’s love interest. She was not quite as nimble as he was, but she could lengthen and control her falls with her helicopter ponytails. At any rate, both were the controllable characters in Donkey Kong Country 2, tasked with rescuing the heavy-set Donkey Kong trapped by Kaptain K. Rool.

Obviously, the story and character-names are ridiculous. What matters, here, is the playing style. Donkey Kong Country was dominated by Donkey Kong, a much slower physical presence, a gorilla. Diddy and Dixie are lightweight chimps, and that means faster, more dynamic platforming. Lead designer Gregg Mayles admitted that, for the Donkey Kong Country franchise, he wanted the levels to be “extremely flowing – where a skilled player could move effortlessly through the levels at great speed.” The point was to make the gameplay as quick and agile as possible, and the pair of chimps that grace the sequel contribute to that, vaulting over precipices, lava, and muck, shooting across barrel-cannons, swinging from rope to rope, and accomplishing other acrobatic feats. Donkey Kong Country 3 saw the re-introduction of a gorilla character, Kiddy Kong, and it suffered because of it. The other trick that makes the second installment an improvement over the first is a lesson belatedly learned from Super Mario World and Super Mario 3, the introduction of mystery and secrecy: special stages only accessible through exploration and skill and, even, an alternate ending. This is married to the environments, far darker and more evocative than those of the previous title: insane carnivals, infested swamps, haunted villages, mutated insect nests, post-industrial wastelands… Certainly far more creative than the stock mountain, forest, and ice levels from Donkey Kong Country. And that soundtrack! David Wise’s often relaxing, dreamy ambiance music is almost counterpunctual, playing as it does behind the busy jumping and dashing that characterizes the gameplay.


Mon Oct 07, 2013 4:50 am
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Post Re: Das and Beau's excellent digital adventures

Well Beau wins the thread. No need to do any more entries. :P


Mon Oct 07, 2013 5:38 am
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23. Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King (Level-5, 2004, Playstation 2)

One of my greatest videogame disappointments was the moment in Final Fantasy X when, after discovering an item that prevented random encounters, I was finally free to roam and explore the environment without the hindrance of sudden battles breaking my immersion. Which was fantastic, until I realized that environments in Final Fantasy X essentially consisted of glorified linear corridors. Even the most open of fields or deserts, in fact, ultimately forced you down straight paths. There were secrets to find, but their distribution through the fictional map was hilarious and ill-conceived. Key items would often lay on the ground, in the most bizarre and arbitrary spots, with no signposting to speak of, which meant that trying to find them was an exercise in either Internet forum-crawling or Adventure game-style pixel hunting. Now, I was a teenager, was not much into Role Playing Games, and was secretly hoping for the Playstation 2 to produce something like the Zelda titles I had enjoyed on the Nintendo 64 during the late 1990s. Shadow of the Colossus and Okami would, near the end of the console’s cycle, fulfill that need. But, in the meantime, I had Final Fantasy X. And, damn, exploration bored me out of my mind! Still, it was the first RPG I played, finished, and clocked 100 hours on. Without it, I would not have bought Dragon Quest VIII, which, as it turned out, was better than Final Fantasy X in every conceivable way.

Except one, perhaps: storytelling. At least, explicit storytelling, in the sense of the script, the dialogue, and the plot. Dragon Quest VIII had wonderful characterizations, but a rather dull overall premise about a cursed scepter that makes its several owners evil. Also, in terms of design, Final Fantasy X’s orientalist science-fiction pastiche was a step above Dragon Quest VIII’s clichéd medieval setting. But, all that said, there are few games, RPG or not, that can be as consistently moving and emotionally involving as Dragon Quest VIII. This is a game were walking around and combing sacks for items can be epiphanic experiences. There is a level of texture and gesture here that is nothing short of gorgeous. Part of this is due to the elegant cel-shaded textures and anime aesthetic, which make it look like an interactive cartoon. Videogames had been hoping to achieve something like this since the Dragon’s Lair laserdisc in 1983, and in the 2000s the concept finally reached critical mass. Like some entries in the Zelda series, Don Bluth’s animated movies, and even many Disney classics, the childlike hand-drawn quality of the graphics and designs, in Dragon’s Quest VIII, is offset by often dramatic and tragic events, endowing the narrative with an air of wisdom, as if it were being filtered through youthful and world-weary perspectives alike.

Meanwhile, the swelling symphonic score by Koichi Sugiyama is ever-present, giving every moment an epic sweep, even when opening a door. And there is plenty of loving animation and detail. One of the most beautiful scenes in video-gaming is when one of your party members, a troll, after having to wait outside towns throughout the entirety of the adventure, because most human settlements are prejudiced against trolls, finally finds a progressive, paradisiacal realm where he is actually admitted in and not treated like a second-class citizen. Players are given control of him, and he runs over the little village with arms outstretched, utterly overjoyed. Exploration, also, feels free and empowering, with hillocks, hamlets, crooks, green fields, and monsters awaiting underneath shadowy canopies, which you can then hire to fight for your optional arena battle team. There are paths through these areas, but players are not usually constrained to them and can hike over the roads less traveled by. Dragon Quest VIII is not an original or groundbreaking entry into the RPG canon, but a refined one. It unites and streamlines various elements of the genre, and then combines them with an eye towards the minute-to-minute aesthetic experience, setting fluid animations in vibrant locales backed by wistful music.


Mon Oct 07, 2013 5:58 am
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So many fun times had with the Donkey Kong games, console and handheld.

Dragon Quest VIII is one I've been meaning to get to for a really long time. Right up my alley.

Great write-ups, guys.

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Mon Oct 07, 2013 6:09 am
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The Donkey Kong Country games mean a lot to me. I think the third is nearly as strong as the second, despite Kiddy's clunkiness.
But...that carnival world, and the honeycomb stinkiness, and the volcano balloon levels where you'd push forward and desperately attempt to reach the next pocket of gas before sinking into the lava. The flooding ship, too. The levels were more inventive for sure.

That's the only entry here I've played so far.

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Mon Oct 07, 2013 12:13 pm
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Post 22. Age of Empires

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Age of Empires is another formative game, truthfully – the second game advances the systems and strategies of its predecessor to new heights. But it isn't special to me like Age of Empires. Some games are as much about the time you experienced them, and how you experienced them as much as the actual quality of the game. For me, Age of Empires is a game with a definite warmth to it. It's the game where I'd build custom maps for friends that were of course, impossible on a regular day, and fiendishly difficult on a good day. It's one of the few game experiences I shared with my dad – I inherited the adventure games of lucas arts, Sid Meier's Civilization 2, Bulldog's Theme Hospital, but Age of Empires, I couldn't really run. But instead of returning the disc to the store, I spent a lot of time sitting in front of the computer with my dad, plotting, deciding what buildings went where, and eventually, pitting my skills against his. Of course, I almost always lost. My dad was a college educated architect with 10+ years of city planning skills in a game about space and economy management versus his 8 year old son. But every minute of it is embedded with the kind of warm nostalgia most kids of my generation associate with SNES games and the original Playstation.

Despite the fact that other RTSes clearly outdo it, its sequel most prominently, and additionally Warcraft 3 and Starcraft, that doesn't exclude it from the golden age of the RTS. Age of Empires is rightfully a hugely influential game, while Blizzard's offerings to the genre tended towards (relatively speaking) fast, aggressive bouts highlighted more by combat and execution of battle strategies, and Sid Meier's Civilization leaned more towards negotiation, denial and economy – Age of Empires sat somewhere in between, there's a marvelous tension in the age mechanic and the units you can make when you pass a resource threshold, you can decide to advance an age, opening up new, more powerful units at a higher cost, but also more efficient methods of gathering resources and better technologies, walls, etc. The less you make early on. The more vulnerable you are to someone who builds their military up strong early – but the stronger your late game becomes because you're not investing your economy into military strength earlier. This tension is central to the decisions made over the course of a game as when you execute your plan often comes at the cost of building an economy. It might not be as filled with mind games as Blizzard's RTSes of the day, or as systemically deep as Civilization but Age of Empires is not just personally important, but one of the vital strategy games of the late 90's, even if it was overshadowed in the end by its predecessors and successors.


Mon Oct 07, 2013 1:28 pm
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best sounds


Mon Oct 07, 2013 1:33 pm
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GOLD PLEASE


Mon Oct 07, 2013 1:37 pm
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haven't played any of these games but enjoying every entry, love how you guys can evoke gameplay and aesthetics so beautifully.

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Mon Oct 07, 2013 2:00 pm
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Oh maaaaan Age of Empires 2 played that role for me. So best.

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Mon Oct 07, 2013 10:09 pm
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Fist wrote:
Oh maaaaan Age of Empires 2 played that role for me. So best.

The amount of time I spent playing AoEII obsessively is what made me stop playing video games altogether. Soooo much fun <3

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Mon Oct 07, 2013 11:31 pm
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I have a hard time deciding if I prefer the first Donkey Kong Country or the second. Donkey Kong himself is underrated; almost everyone says that the pairing of Diddy and Dixie was the best of the franchise, but I actually like the heavyset DK. The simple act of landing on an enemy is more satisfying with someone of his girth.

I ever so slightly prefer the soundtrack of the first one. It's hard to top Aquatic Ambiance and Fear Factory.

I think I even prefer the atmosphere of the first one. In places. The moody caverns with their ambient lighting; the incredibly memorable thunderstorm in the second level; and the snowstorm in Snow Barrel Blast that gets heavier and heavier as the level goes on. Of course, the second one is no slouch either. I'm fond of the creepy forests in the fifth world and the mysterious jungles of the Lost World.


Mon Oct 07, 2013 11:55 pm
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Rasaokis wrote:
I think I even prefer the atmosphere of the first one. In places. The moody caverns with their ambient lighting; the incredibly memorable thunderstorm in the second level; and the snowstorm in Snow Barrel Blast that gets heavier and heavier as the level goes on. Of course, the second one is no slouch either. I'm fond of the creepy forests in the fifth world and the mysterious jungles of the Lost World.

:up:
There are some indelibly almost-melancholic passages in there.

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Mon Oct 07, 2013 11:58 pm
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Rasaokis wrote:
I think I even prefer the atmosphere of the first one. In places. The moody caverns with their ambient lighting; the incredibly memorable thunderstorm in the second level; and the snowstorm in Snow Barrel Blast that gets heavier and heavier as the level goes on. Of course, the second one is no slouch either. I'm fond of the creepy forests in the fifth world and the mysterious jungles of the Lost World.


Oh, I love the first one too. Those moments you describe are great. I like all the Donkey Kong Country games, really. Even the third one, which has some fantastic and creative levels. Just that the second one, to me, is the most consistent. It refined the achievements of the first and pointed the way for some of the things the third did (the special stages and multiple endings and so on).


Tue Oct 08, 2013 12:05 am
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