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 Notes from London Underground 
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Post Re: Notes from London Underground

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Haha. Magnets.

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Fri Jul 19, 2013 12:07 am
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
I'll have more to say soon.
I watched this, and I agree with Trip about its heart. There were cues there in the muted colors and humor and songs (especially the songs!) that I would say made the environment decidedly not clinical. It was dingy, certainly, but accessible, and strangers were often rather kind, which fits with my (admittedly brief) experience of London. Good movie!

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Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:28 am
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It's lesser Kaurismaki, but since he's one of my favourite directors I still find it wonderful. :P

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Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:43 am
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It wasn't until I watched every Kaurismäki film that I really started to like him.


Sun Jul 21, 2013 12:41 pm
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
I watched this, and I agree with Trip about its heart. There were cues there in the muted colors and humor and songs (especially the songs!) that I would say made the environment decidedly not clinical. It was dingy, certainly, but accessible, and strangers were often rather kind, which fits with my (admittedly brief) experience of London. Good movie!

When I was younger and I had to visit the local surgery, my doctor would smile a lot and make jokes to comfort me. He thought he was the second coming of Tommy Cooper. I didn't agree. I thought he got his delivery all wrong. He was nice enough - helping me out and all that - but, no thanks to his cold handshake, I couldn't push this idea out of my mind that I was still sat in a doctor's surgery with some unknown ailment. If he revealed a Sandinista! vinyl from under his white coat, I still don't think it would have helped any.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

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Sun Jul 21, 2013 5:32 pm
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Kaurismäki is a bit like Marmite, it seems. Only, more Bressonian and less like tar.

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Sun Jul 21, 2013 6:44 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
Kaurismäki is a bit like Marmite, it seems. Only, more Bressonian and less like tar.

I've only seen one, and probably the wrong one. Which could be like experiencing Marmite for the first time courtesy of Twiglets.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

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Sun Jul 21, 2013 6:48 pm
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Notes from Underground wrote:
When I was younger and I had to visit the local surgery, my doctor would smile a lot and make jokes to comfort me. He thought he was the second coming of Tommy Cooper. I didn't agree. I thought he got his delivery all wrong. He was nice enough - helping me out and all that - but, no thanks to his cold handshake, I couldn't push this idea out of my mind that I was still sat in a doctor's surgery with some unknown ailment. If he revealed a Sandinista! vinyl from under his white coat, I still don't think it would have helped any.
Hahaha. It probably would have helped me, to be honest. :)

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Sun Jul 21, 2013 9:56 pm
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Notes from Underground wrote:
I've only seen one, and probably the wrong one. Which could be like experiencing Marmite for the first time courtesy of Twiglets.

My Béla reference. :(

Haven't had Twiglets since that one school disco I went to in 1993.

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Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:11 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
My Béla reference. :(

Don't worry, I got it.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

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Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:43 pm
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What is this film and what does it have to do with me?

It's only appropriate that after all this talk of heart that the next thing I watch be Dirty Pretty Things: a film that deals with the exploitation of illegal immigrants and illegal organ donation (the apt symbolism used early on: heart in the toilet).

The film's title suits its aesthetic, always ugly upon pretty or pretty upon ugly in some way or another (such is life). Neon light litters dirty but not uninhabitable conditions; London can be a nasty shithole but at least it has electricity and isn't situated in a war-torn country, and it has plenty of tunnels to utilise for the much appreciated tunnel shot*. The circumstantially sullied Okwe and Senay are portrayed by the visually appealing Ejiofor and Tautou. And characters sit directly on one side of the good or evil line but can operate to both harm and help proceedings.

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*a tunnel that I hope is actually in London

Initial Frear connected fears were that this was going to be a gritty case of the morally perfect and metaphorically but not physically impenetrable immigrants facing off against the evil forces of Nazi-saluting immigration officers. While the officers are represented with a typically hateful authoritarian sneer, their roles are minor and serve only to enforce a threat to Okwe and Senay of being caught-out by immigration policy – more of a deterministic symbol than a fully fleshed-out organisation run by human-beings. Okwe is still perfect and perfectly humane, with the supposed negative suggestions of his past being revealed as a severe case of 'not his fault', but Ejiofor's performance somehow steers him away from annoying goody-two-shoes depiction into an area of actual humanity. This is aided by the development of comical interactions with a supporting cast of genuinely amusing characters. These loving foundations also help to take the derelict lives of immigrants and morph their fates into an entertaining thriller with Soderberghian plot twists; a case of taking control and an implication that maybe the nasty universe isn't so deterministic after all. Villainous caricatures compete over plot priority but are thwarted by either the intellect or perseverance of Okwe, Senay, and friends. The good guys efforts eventually result in a pretty, cleverly-tied bow but, as to avoid audience eye-rolling, the films opts out of the impracticality of a perfect romance ending.

Prior to this, I'd yet to be convinced by what little I had seen from Frears – The Queen really didn't help. It appears that when supported by a solid Steven Knight script, he's not all that bad. Dirty Pretty Things is part comedy, part drama, part crime thriller, part romance, part so on. Lobbing all these elements together could have resulted in an ugly mess; but the outcome was instead a neat and fluid operation. (Yeah, me and my innards went there.) I think the humour was the most significant element to its success. It's a pity that a band I saw one time and didn't really like had to harm the film's title by mere association.

What does this film tell me about London?

Contrary to popular belief, there is still a manufacturing industry in England: a single London sweatshop run entirely by dick-licking immigrants and their lone gelatinous master. To that I say: suck it, Maggie; we're still going strong after all these years. These immigrants can be quite nice people, too, but I thank God I'm a well-educated citizen with a passport.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

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Mon Jul 22, 2013 3:29 pm
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Cool. I rather liked it myself. Frears is better than you might have assumed from The Queen, though I felt that film was unfairly maligned coming from the worst type of film as it does (the biopic).
He's made consistently "decent" pictures at least.

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Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:28 pm
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The Grifters is his best film. Not very London-y.

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Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
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New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10


Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:34 pm
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Neither is High Fidelity, despite the fact that the novel it's based on was.

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Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:54 pm
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Trip wrote:
Frears is better than you might have assumed from The Queen, though I felt that film was unfairly maligned coming from the worst type of film as it does (the biopic).
He's made consistently "decent" pictures at least.

Trip, please stop ruining my rash judgements with informed opinions.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

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Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:10 pm
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Rash judgements are usually pretty accurate.

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Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:12 pm
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Frears' best London movie is Sammy and Rosie Get Laid.

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Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:37 pm
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
Frears' best London movie is Sammy and Rosie Get Laid.

Added to the list.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Mon Jul 22, 2013 11:08 pm
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This is an excellent thread :up:

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Tue Jul 23, 2013 12:14 am
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Notes from Underground wrote:
Added to the list.
Excellent! Who doesn’t like a comedy about riots, sex, and torture?

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Tue Jul 23, 2013 12:45 am
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ribbon wrote:
This is an excellent thread :up:

Thank you.

Shieldmaiden wrote:
Excellent! Who doesn’t like a comedy about riots, sex, and torture?

My favourite genre. :heart:

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Tue Jul 23, 2013 1:45 am
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This is a nice thread, although I haven't seen any of these films.

I tried to think of a suggestion, but all I could think of was The Falls.


Tue Jul 23, 2013 6:36 am
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I just thought of a great one! Bedazzled (the 1967 one) has a lot of valuable advice for anyone looking to sell his soul in London. And, your list seems a bit low on comedy, so maybe you can squeeze in one more?

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Tue Jul 23, 2013 7:11 am
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Really enjoying reading this, but I don't have anything to add at the moment.

If you're still open to suggestions, I would recommend Franco Rosso's Babylon http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080406/. Makes for a good companion piece to Pressure - it's Jamaicans around West London again, cinema-verite style.

Regardless, it's a good thread.

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Tue Jul 23, 2013 7:19 am
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Despite being hilariously corrupt, having a low standard of living and one of the highest murder rates in the world, Jamaica does have one thing going for it: the amazing language. I could listen to someone speak Jamaican patois all day.

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Tue Jul 23, 2013 11:26 am
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Film above obviously has liberal media bias.

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Tue Jul 23, 2013 11:37 am
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Post The Servant

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What is this film and what does it have to do with me?

Warning: tinfoil hat theories and wankfest to follow.

If I wasn't fearful of being dubbed a handwaving prick, I'd dive straight into this by saying the camera-work of The Servant is like a subtle dance (a waltz?), fluidly pivoting on and rotating around the movement and conflict of its central figures. I am a handwaving prick and that is how I wish to start. (So defiant. So meta.) According to Strictly Come Dancing, every dance must have a story. This dance's story is one of a wealthy young man, Tony (James Fox), and the development of his relationship with a newly hired manservant, Barrett (Dirk Bogarde). The manservant begins his role in petty competition with Tony's missus-in-waiting for the control of Tony's life and expensive household, while Tony has to fight to appease the two. Conflict often takes over the foreground of compositions with face-offs while its singular perceived cause lurks – sometimes directly between those two faces – in the background. The initial bickering and lip-puckering comes across like a case of jealousy meets envy between a man's love interest and his closet homosexual servant; an idea that was eventually repressed into the depths of my mind with the introduction of a new maid, the servant's quite attractive secret lover whom he perversely disguises as his sister.

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conflict, a rift between

This is where The Servant begins to leak hints of a blacker beast: a case of class warfare condensed into a single household; a work that has potential to be subject to Marxist criticism à la Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, with Barrett in the role of Byronic hero Heathcliff. It is slowly uncovered that Barrett's initial actions lacked sincerity and were instead a sycophantic ploy used to gain favour with his master. Once in a position of reasonable safety, the ploy changes into conniving exploitation and snide mockery. The exploitation is based mostly around sex; the employing of a femme fatale (Barrett's 'sister'-cum-plaything) to push Tony into realms of infidelity and debauchery.

Unlike Heathcliff, Barrett isn't a tortured romantic and the reason for his actions aren't blatantly stated nor are they easily perceptible. (It may be a desire to close a gulf in wealth or a resentment caused by the requirement to serve or insecurity due to the 'womanly nature' of his profession or a Nietzschean will to power. I don't know. Ambiguity. Pick as many as you like.) Whatever the reason, his drive is portrayed as vengefully as Heathcliff's, with Barrett's compulsion not only being to take over the role of his master but also to humiliate and inflict suffering in the process. The irrational uncertainty, Tony's lack of awareness, and collective lack of true self-reflection are exaggerated by the frequent and ironic use of mirrors and reflective surfaces. (For important revelations, shadows are projected.)

Image
morphed reflections

The dark dominates as the film moves forward. Snowy and rainy day-time London exteriors appear less and less until eventually the outside loses any relevance at all. Instead an extravagent and large house made to look claustrophobic by squalor and low camera placement is all that remains. And I guess you could say, by enshrouding Tony in darkness, Barrett succeeds in his quest. He pushes Tony until he is devoid of any of his previous redeeming features. They're now 'equal', only without real resolve or triumph. It's people wallowing together in the muck on the floor, which is exactly how I like it. You know, wallowing in misery. Mmmm, mmmisery.

What does this film tell me about London?

Them servant peasants are always dead northern like and can't be trusted to do anything right, right. Best get them immigrants to do it, yeah. Them dirty pretty things. Pay 'em less, below min wage, because they're mad-fer-it. And far more honest, right, even if they don't put out much and bite during blowies, yeah.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:14 pm
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Post Re: Notes from London Underground

omg watch nighthawks next plzplzplz

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Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:21 pm
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snapper wrote:
omg watch nighthawks next plzplzplz

Don't ask me. Ask the gods. It's decided on a dice roll and the list keeps growing (thanks, everybody). The odds aren't looking great for you.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:27 pm
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ugh

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Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:35 pm
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die roll? you're stealing everyone's ideas

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Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:35 pm
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snapper wrote:
die roll? you're stealing everyone's ideas

It's what the youth call innovation.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:37 pm
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Fantastic movie.

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"I hate the dark, the sharks liars. And the stems of cherry..."

Like Someone in Love (Kiarostami, 2012) 4/10
Killing Them Softly (Dominik, 2012) 2/10
The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (Pal/Levin, 1962) 6/10
The Dark Past (Mate', 1948) 7/10
New Rose Hotel (Ferrara, 1998) 3/10


Tue Jul 23, 2013 5:20 pm
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Fabian Thomsett wrote:
If you're still open to suggestions, I would recommend Franco Rosso's Babylon http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080406/. Makes for a good companion piece to Pressure - it's Jamaicans around West London again, cinema-verite style.

I copped Babylon along with Pressure. Have yet to watch it, though.

Kinda related: I dug season 1 of Top Boy (Channel 4) which is set in a fictional housing project in East London:

Image Image

Image Image

I have a soft spot for the main plotline which is generic, and I really like the acting, atmosphere, and language.


Tue Jul 23, 2013 8:23 pm
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The Servant is so, so great. So much claustrophobic muck wallowing! And I think its moral application is clear: do your flower arranging yourself.

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Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Bookshelf


Tue Jul 23, 2013 10:43 pm
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Shieldmaiden wrote:
And I think its moral application is clear: do your flower arranging yourself.

:fresh:

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Tue Jul 23, 2013 11:18 pm
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Notes from Underground wrote:
Don't ask me. Ask the gods. It's decided on a dice roll and the list keeps growing (thanks, everybody). The odds aren't looking great for you.

I'll sue, I tell you.

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Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:21 pm
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JediMoonShyne wrote:
I'll sue, I tell you.

That was just a lie I made up to make snapper think I wasn't intentionally avoiding Nighthawks (1978, some guy). I'd rather watch a Stallone police thriller.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:29 pm
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hey why don't you throw yourself in front of a train

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Latest notable first-time viewings:

* The Sun in a Net / Uher
** The Seashell and the Clergyman / Dulac
The Tales of Beatrix Potter / Mills
* A Flood in Ba'ath Country / Amiralay
Times and Winds / Erdem
Most Beautiful Island / Asensio
* Japanese Girls Never Die / Matsui
* Birth Certificate / Różewicz
Bush Mama / Gerima
** Paris Is Burning / Livingston


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Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:51 pm
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snapper wrote:
hey why don't you throw yourself in front of a train

:heart:

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:53 pm
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Post Moonlighting

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What is this film and what does it have to do with me?

Moonlight (verb):
To work on the side (at a secondary job), often in the evening or during the night.

Moonlighting (present participle of Moonlight):
When Polak workmen are sent over to London to do illegal labour on the cheap under the leadership of a single man, sometimes named Nowak, sometimes played by Jeremy Irons, who happens to be the only-lonely English speaker. These men can be used for the renovation of houses, in particular those of their superiors.

Me (self-obsessed introvert) and my thoughts and feelings:
Cinema loves immigrants because immigrants are oft-treated badly and she (cinema) loves the injustice of that treatment, among many other things. I love cinema because I love her portrayal of injustice (among many other things) because it makes me think thoughts and feel feelings. I like to sit and think thoughts and feel feelings but do little with them. But I don't love feeling all the feelings all of the time, just some of the feelings some of the time. I can only pretend to feel the feelings that result from real injustice as genuine feelings even though I try quite hard to think thoughts about them (that is, unless you count having to access porn and PirateBay through proxies as real injustice). Without real injustice to distract me from my own trivial thinking of thoughts and feeling of feelings, I don't know what my point is. I just ramble on about said trivial thought thinking and feeling feeling, not knowing where I'm going or what I'm doing. It's all quite confusing and meaningless, like pushing a rock up a hill and letting it roll back down simply because you haven't got anything better to do. I think they call it the price of privilege (as influenced by modern society).

Moonlighting, which does not involve me or the rest of modern society's privileged sons, is an example of foreigners pushing a rock up a hill with more purpose than I ever could: an incessant striving to reach a peak that doesn't appear to be getting any closer, desperately clawing away at anything within grasp, with doubts creeping up over whether the job will ever get done. ("It's not true I never finish a job..." says Polak Nowak. Response of a vintage London xenophobe: "bloody foreigners can't do anything right."). It starts with an unnerving surrealist edge, in an airport under the pressure of harsh, pulsing lights. From the early going, an eerie electronic ambient soundtrack, inaudible mutterings, and Nowak's dry narration set a tone of anxiety and paranoia. From time to time, as to increase stress levels, the ambience is interrupted by the sound of thumping hearts. Foggy or dusty or murky settings obscure the film's vision and add to its mild hallucinatory feel. The thematic content, along with a few other superficial similarities – narration, mainly – conjure thoughts of A Man Escaped (hence all of my obvious references to Sisyphus; something I read about in that famous Kamoo book and saw mentioned in a Bresson related Ebert article).

But Nowak's personal struggle isn't just about house renovation and getting paid. He wishes to see his Anna again – an ominous face floating above a Wrangler sweatshirt, shown to us via a small photograph – nervously worrying over her fate amidst the recent political strife happening back in his native land. The strife is discovered by Nowak while in London, through television and newspapers, but he neglects to tell his fellow comrades, instead forcing them to work under increasingly difficult conditions – long hours with dwindling monetary funds. In spite of Nowak's manipulation, his 'caught between rock and hard place' plight generates plenty of sympathy thanks to moments of self-sacrifice. And while I guess this all sounds overly serious and stressful, it isn't entirely. There are short respites of slapstick dotted around along with the occasional line of funny dialogue; and a scene where the workers are desperately trying to pile their rubbish onto a skip whilst its unaware carrier is driving away is jolly good fun.

I thought Moonlighting was 'versatile' and clever, although I can't exactly confirm why. I have little knowledge Polish politics and therefore have a limited appreciation for the work – or Nowak's character – as a greater metaphor for Polish government ("I can speak their language...but I don't know what they really mean.") but I knew it was there without having to consult the internet. The film may be a more general observation of communism: the blunt "go back to Poland, you commies!" yelled in the latter stages, as well as the softer allusions to communism's opposition to religion ("I don't want to confess. I don't believe in God.") support that idea. Personally, I've no real idea of what it's about. I know that meaningful political stuff is probably super cool and interesting, which is why I intend on reading about it on Wikipedia later, but life is about priorities and I have more important stuff to consider at the moment. I can't get any decent seeders on this torrent. It says I have another six hours left until the download reaches its end.

What does this film tell me about London?

Polaks love their football. In London circa 1980 they used to watch Liverpool matches on the television and get quite agitated over a bunch of silly men kicking a bag of air around. In the 1990s, glory went elsewhere and the majority of London's Polak audience went with it. The physical entities stayed in London but their spiritual hearts, which were already located up north, took a reasonably short trip via the M62 into Manchester (unless they walked, then it would have been a long trip). It appears that London will forever be draped in red – just not the red of Arsenal. London will forever get quite agitated over a bunch of silly men kicking a bag of air around.

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"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

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Wed Jul 24, 2013 11:29 pm
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Post Re: Moonlighting

ha :up:

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Wed Jul 24, 2013 11:35 pm
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Post Wimbledon

Image

What is this film and what does it have to do with me?

Nice opening credits. Sort-of decent clay-court sequence. Oh dear. I laughed. What if I like it? Zone 6 is looking empty. Bumbling conversation between person with penis and person with vagina. Thank you based Dunst. I don't like it. Attempts at tennis based discussion between person with penis and person with vagina. David Gray on soundtrack. Thank you based Dunst. I hate it. Jaime Lannister. Pat Cash. Tennis consultant. Feeding lines to Jurassic Park man. "If she hits short, you come in." Basic physics equals great coaching advice. Nice shots. Nice sunset. Wading through shit to find pennies. Montage. Painfully prolonging the inevitable happy ending with artificial suspense. Ivanišević wasn't English. "Please God, please make it end." Actual quote from film. Is this satire? Dedicated to Mark McCormack 1930-2003. So sorry, Mark. Can't apologise enough. Needs more suffering. I suggest a sequel with a doomed marriage. Crippling depression. An apocalyptic end. Maybe a teepee.

What does this film tell me about London?


_________________
"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Thu Jul 25, 2013 7:12 pm
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Post Re: Notes from London Underground

Haha. First one I haven't seen, and you've convinced me to keep it that way.

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Thu Jul 25, 2013 11:31 pm
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Post Re: Notes from London Underground

:lol: I think I liked Wimbledon more than Match Point, certainly more than Scoop or Cassandra's Dream. But KiKi D can do no wrong in my eyes

is Darling on your radar? she maybe goes to Italy in it but I remember she has a cool apartment. Or maybe that's Petulia.


Thu Jul 25, 2013 11:54 pm
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hirtho wrote:
is Darling on your radar? she maybe goes to Italy in it but I remember she has a cool apartment. Or maybe that's Petulia.

London with a little bit of Italy and France added to the mix is okay with me. Added to the list. Thanks, wig.

_________________
"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Fri Jul 26, 2013 12:12 am
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cool! hope you like it. If you can't like looking at Julie Christie for 2 hours there's something wrong with you...

The guy who wrote it also wrote Eyes Wide Shut and Far from the Madding Crowd and some other stuff which I can't rmember if it's London or elsewheres in Englad (or France, like Two for the Road which I loved and I think PRouge did too). Also look into a director named Bryan Forbes. His Seance on a Wet Afternoon just came in from Netflix and I remember liking the rest of his stuff and think some/all was London.

also, the best London movie ever is Jarman's Jubilee, you will learn a lot!!!


Fri Jul 26, 2013 12:16 am
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hirtho wrote:
also, the best London movie ever is Jarman's Jubilee, you will learn a lot!!!

Richard O'Brien, Adam Ant, Siouxsie Sioux. An Eno score. Yes.

_________________
"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Fri Jul 26, 2013 12:35 am
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Post Bronco Bullfrog

Image

What is this film and what does it have to do with me?

Bronco Bullfrog is about the kind of people who grow up to become 2012 Tour de France winners. Young Mod (I think – I've never researched the culture) lads in the uncomfortable phase of their youth, plodding along through a traditional role involving defiance against parents. These young lads, like most young lads, and like most people in general, spit words that their actions can't always back. They try to like to act like adults and therefore moan a lot, and they think the grass is always greener someplace else. They make dumb and sometimes criminal decisions. They awkwardly attempt conversation with girls and succeed because girls don't know any better. And, even though their houses are a bit dingy and their families don't have a lot of money (but enough to purchase their child a motorcycle), they won't learn how good they had it until they get older. ("Boring as usual. Nothing to do around here." Shit. Try living in Coventry.)

Image
Jeddy as a kid

Apparently Platts-Mills hired untrained kid actors because they saw their lines as they were written and didn't attempt to interpret the material as anything other than a reading lesson. A strong part of me feels that a lack of money had a lot to do with it. Not that it matters because it works out okay enough, giving the dialogue an awkward, stripped-down delivery that could easily be connected with youths progressing into adulthood. My attempts at picking up women back when I was sixteen were not dissimilar to Platts-Mills interpretation; very minimalist. So minimalist that I gave it up pretty quickly and went back to firing arrows at Abaddon on Guild Wars. It took me three years to pluck up the courage to try minimalism again, even when Abaddon was long forgotten and replaced by science fiction books. Fortunately for Bronco Bullfrog's protagonist, Del boy, he has a motorbike and the benefit of rock music accompanied montages to cut out all of the lengthy silence that will inevitably interrupt his communication with the opposite sex.

I don't know what else I can say about Bronco Bullfrog so I'll interrupt my own silence and clumsily cut this chat short. I guess I wouldn't ever call the film dull – I didn't check the remaining runtime nearly as much as I could have – and it has a few moments that pleasingly catch the eye. And it was, in some way, charming on its surface, even if I never thought about looking underneath it. It's a worthwhile watch if you can ignore Pokémon encounter fight scenes (the sort that make pro wrestling look sincere) and if you're into kids talking like intentionally stilted Eastenders characters. Plus it's short. Perhaps the lovely Jeddy can explain what all the unexpressed fuss is about.

What does this film tell me about London?

The children of London were born in barns, i.e. none of them know how to close a fucking door. All that threatening to clip them 'round the ear and slap them in the face isn't doing anything. I suggest a naughty step or the early development of some kind of psychological inferiority complex based around the parental bond. Then they'll learn to shut the door. The last time I was this distracted by such a trivial lesson is when Fassbinder taught me, through Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, that it's typical for people in Germany to never finish their drinks.

_________________
"I thought, well, heaven, all that marble and giltwork, sounds a bit middle class. I would prefer something that was, I don't know, carpeted and had skirting boards, things like that." — Alan Moore

Last.fm


Wed Jul 31, 2013 12:12 am
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Notes from Underground wrote:
My attempts at picking up women back when I was sixteen were not dissimilar to Platts-Mills interpretation; very minimalist. So minimalist that I gave it up pretty quickly and went back to firing arrows at Abaddon on Guild Wars. It took me three years to pluck up the courage to try minimalism again, even when Abaddon was long forgotten and replaced by science fiction books.
Forget minimalism. You should have tried amusing film reviews. :heart:

Quote:
The last time I was this distracted by such a trivial lesson is when Fassbinder taught me, through Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, that it's typical for people in Germany to never finish their drinks.
Ha! That bothered me, too!

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Incredibles 2 ▪ Young Frankenstein ▪ The Lair of the White Worm ▪ The Blob ▪ A Quiet Place ▪ King Kong (1933) ▪ Atomic Blonde ▪ Raw ▪ Rampage ▪ Detroit ▪ Before I Fall ▪ The Levelling ▪ A United Kingdom


Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Bookshelf


Wed Jul 31, 2013 12:31 am
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