It is currently Tue Aug 21, 2018 10:04 am



Reply to topic  [ 1777 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 32, 33, 34, 35, 36
 Char's Cinematic Caravan 
Author Message
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Image
Semi-Pro | Alterman | 2008

It doesn't really compare well to the McKay-Ferrell collaborations but Will Ferrell gives it his all and there're so many funny people in the cast that one can't help but have fun just watching them play off each other. I had a good time. thx for the reminder, undinum!

Image
To New Shores | Sirk | 1937

Eh, this was underwhelming. Zarah Leander is rather beautiful and has a nice deep voice but she's no Dietrich or Garbo in terms of screen presence and most of her acting here consists of her reacting super dramatically to any and all situations. So there's no real difference between when she's a much sought after singer to when she ends up in that horrible Aussie prison. All the tragic melodrama is really pretty predictable and while there are some nice shots with mirrors and fog and so on, I kept wishing I was watching Morocco or something instead.

Image
A Tale of Springtime | Rohmer | 1990

It's good.. really good but lacking the magic of the Rohmer films I unreservedly love wherein by the end they've opened up into something transcendental. Greater than a sum of their parts and so on. Which this one doesn't. But the lightness with which he handles the conversations about romance and philosophy and so on are still marvelous. And the film really opens up visually when it moves out of the apartments into the countryside.

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Wed Apr 23, 2014 10:48 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Image
Osaka Elegy | Mizoguchi | 1936


My introduction to 30s Mizoguchi has me so surprised. This is rather different (in terms of visual style at least) from his more meditative 50s films and yet no less impressive. There's a more youthful energy to these for sure. Plus, the first half plays out almost like a comedy lampooning the older men trying to juggle mistresses while being dominated by their wives and so on. And there's a wonderful sequence where a puppet theatre performance (wikipedia tells me it's bunraku) gradually starts to mirror the dramedy that's playing out among certain audience members. Almost every other shot has people framed in two different planes on the same screen trying to have a conversation (distance, inability to actually connect etc etc ... obvious perhaps but no less beautiful for that) and lots of diagonal split screens that lead to striking geometrical compositions. These become even more interesting once we move into the love nest which has all this art deco architecture with round windows and such. The final scene on the bridge is easily the highlight - For some reason, I am used to thinking of the women in Mizoguchi's films having very little power but that closing scene is such a powerfully feminist statement.

Image
The Downfall AKA The Folded Paper Crane | Mizoguchi | 1935


Trains :heart: :heart: !!! Despite the gorgeous opening and the wonderful structural device wherein a delayed train triggers a complex flashback (Ijaazat!), I started off thinking this was lesser than Osaka Elegy just because it so quickly felt so much more heavy-handed dramatically as compared to the former. The villains are all almost cartoonishly evil and the protagonist (who I'll argue is the young lad and not really Osen) is perpetually hunched low with his face against a wall with tears in his eyes etc. But then another train sequence brought me right back It's a flashback within a flashback depicting the arrival of a train in a tiny town and the train appears almost magical enveloped in steam and once it's passed, the young boy walks along the tracks and the metal on the tracks seem to light up and glow leaving a trail behind him. It's one of the most beautiful things ever. Plus, the film itself turns into something other than what I was expecting. Mizoguchi does away with the specific villains and really focuses in on the moral conflict that the socioeconomic milieu places on these women or this woman in particular. The second half is also characterized by these crazy super-impositions that initially serve to make these looped-in flashbacks more remarkable but then take on even more import once they mirror her declining mental health. It's a strange and wonderful film.

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Sun Jun 08, 2014 12:23 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

30s Gooch is tops.

_________________
I Watch Films, But...
In a word, I think that, far from favoring directors’ formal inventiveness, widescreen, instead, stifles it. It is, I’m more and more persuaded, if not the only, at least the main culprit for the expressive poverty of the image today. - Eric Rohmer
Vimeo / / / Flickr


Sun Jun 08, 2014 12:37 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

charulata wrote:
Plus, the film itself turns into something other than what I was expecting. Mizoguchi does away with the specific villains and really focuses in on the moral conflict that the socioeconomic milieu places on these women or this woman in particular. The second half is also characterized by these crazy super-impositions that initially serve to make these looped-in flashbacks more remarkable but then take on even more import once they mirror her declining mental health. It's a strange and wonderful film.
Mmm, this sounds so good. I have to see!

_________________
Incredibles 2 ▪ Young Frankenstein ▪ The Lair of the White Worm ▪ The Blob ▪ A Quiet Place ▪ King Kong (1933) ▪ Atomic Blonde ▪ Raw ▪ Rampage ▪ Detroit ▪ Before I Fall ▪ The Levelling ▪ A United Kingdom


Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Bookshelf


Sun Jun 08, 2014 6:50 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Shieldmaiden wrote:
]Mmm, this sounds so good. I have to see!

yep, it's remarkable and I really think it'll surprise you. Super melodramatic though... I have to warn you.

Image
A Geisha | Mizoguchi | 1953

Mizoguchi's style is a lot more understated here as compared to his 30s films... the camera moves a lot less and there are fewer of those overt stylistic flourishes (compared to the two-plane conversations and the virtual split screens of Osaka Elegy or the super-impositions from Osen). Instead the film allows the tragedy of the material and the bleakness of the societal structure that these women are trapped in to creep up on us a lot more slowly. The sequence where Miroharu finally breaks her will and succumbs to Kanzaki is just tour de force. The way the camera shoots Kanzaki from above such that even as he's lying down on the floor, he is dominant over Miroharu and the way she almost wills herself into the most constrained and narrow corner of the frame to change out of her kimono. But for all its bleakness, I found the ending shot of the two women walking down the street rather ambivalent. They may have resigned to the situation but they still depict dignity and some agency and Miroharu's monologue about loneliness versus connection has us believing that at least the two women have each other to fall back on. Beautiful stuff this.

Image
Poppy | Mizoguchi | 1935


Was really excited to see this one considering it was supposedly lost forever and then a decent print was miraculously located etc but of all the Mizoguchi I've seen so far, this is the least. The subtitles were missing and/or out of sync for part of the screening and may have contributed but mostly the film just reminded me too much of mediocre Bollywood meldorama tropes. The country folk are honest salt of the earth and the city is this big corrupting influence etc. Especially weird seeing this right after A Geisha. That one is all about the importance of free will and mourns the way it's taken away from these women by the societal structure / norms of the Geisha community. This one otoh seems to be preaching some kind of weird adherence to promises made years ago even if one's heart isn't in it. It also has surprisingly poorly written female characters. Sayako mostly comes off as a cry baby who just wants to be married so she can buy his&hers bowls. Fujio starts off being more interesting but then in a couple of lines of dialogue we are asked to believe that she's some kind of horrible hussy or some such who deserves to be alone for the rest of her life just because she chose someone other than the man she was betrothed to as a child.. wuuut.The sequence where Sayako and Ono run into Fujio at the market though is really sublime and feels like it almost belongs in a different movie.

Am kinda curious to read the Soseki novel the film is adapted from.. I kept getting the feeling that the film was chopped down or some such and/or that scenes are perhaps missing.

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Sun Jun 08, 2014 11:04 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

good stuff char

_________________
Please TRIP and Die


Sun Jun 08, 2014 11:07 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

thx twipsie :D

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Sun Jun 08, 2014 11:10 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

charulata wrote:
Image
Semi-Pro | Alterman | 2008

I shall watch this tonight in your honour! :heart:

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon Jun 09, 2014 4:25 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

"If you have a small child, use it as a shield! ":D :D

Image
The Portrait of Madame Yuki | Mizoguchi | 1950


God, the most visually resplendent and also probs the weirdest of all the Mizoguchis I've seen thus far. It's so lurid and fraught with sexual tension throughout and yet, the ending feels so spiritual and in line with his conversion to Buddhism which I believe happened right around the time of this film. It starts off seeming like this portrait of a woman trapped in a bad marriage but gradually transforms into a film about various people trapped by their own psychosexual desires and perversions. Despite the opulent surroundings (the house/inn itself but also the wonderful hills and the lake surrounding the same) and a fair number of open compositions, the whole film feels so claustrophobic and one can almost feel the sweat coming off of these people. Also, this one had more of those lovely diagonal cuts splitting the screen that I loved so much in Osaka Elegy. Weird as fuck and totally great.

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Tue Jun 10, 2014 4:28 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Whoa, sounds fantastic.

_________________
Please TRIP and Die


Tue Jun 10, 2014 11:37 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Image
The Life of Oharu | Mizoguchi | 1952


Played out rather differently and with significantly more impact for me this time around. I watched it on the big screen about 6-7 years ago and found it devastating etc... but my engagement at the time was mostly with the plight of the titular Oharu herself as a deeply unfortunate character and the scathing criticism of the prevailing social mores and the treatment of women etc. ("fish on a chopping board served up any way (he) likes"). But this time around it felt a lot more universal and what struck me about the episodic structure wasn't so much the misery piled upon misery but rather humanity's constant (failed) quest for happiness mostly from / via external forces.... I mean, it's pretty obvious given the lyrics of the song etc. and yet, I only noticed it this time. Plus, Oharu is so much more strong-willed throughout than I recalled her being. That goblin cat scene is so damn powerful especially coming as late as it does and as a response to the most banal kind of injustice she faces in the film. Heartbreaking in a really different way.. more a sense of hopelessness for humankind in general. I can't rank these but I see now why so many consider it his greatest.

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Thu Jun 12, 2014 12:49 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

I'm beginning to notice a theme here...

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Thu Jun 12, 2014 5:59 am
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Image
Miss Oyu | Mizoguchi | 1951

You can all keep your Sanshos and Ugetsus and Oharus. Miss Oyu is where it's at though. My favorite Mizoguchi now and perhaps because the protagonists here are trapped not by economic hardships but by their own rather complicated and confusing emotions, I found it way more moving than any of the others. There are really no villains here. Everyone's actions can be justified, everyone is more than willing to sacrifice themselves so their loved ones can find happiness and yet, there is nothing but despair to be found. His formalism is also used to such great emotional effect here. Seemingly endless long takes of these three characters that feel balletic in their choreography as the characters move towards and away from each other and each of these movements gains so much meaning. Kinuyo Tanaka is great as usual but the character that ends up breaking my heart the most if the younger sister. Her character seems to want nothing more than to simply walk out of her own life through the entire film .. and even on screen she manages to make herself really slight and occupies the least amount of space and it's all really rather unbearable. There are also echoes of Madame Yuki .. that lovely long shot at the end of Yuki is repeated here twice ... making my heart tie up in knots each time afraid that the scene would end the same way as in Yuki. Mizo also uses sound more audaciously here than in any of his other films. Loud eerie bird sounds, howling wind, sounds of moving trains all gain an ominous quality contrasting the beautiful landscapes these three protagonists frequently wander through. Also, best use of the architecture of the house... an endless labyrinth of translucent tatami walls that offers these characters no escape from the social mores that have them trapped in this impossible situation. Masterpiece. I'm going to go cry now.

Image
The 47 Ronin I & II | Mizoguchi | 1941


I agree with the complaints about it being overlong and too drawn out (not to mention the surprisingly sloppy repetition of information between the first and second film) and there are two long digressive sequences that I found rather hard to sit through (the one sword-fight outside the Noh performance and the weird sappy romance that feels shoe-horned in at the end). That said, at least at an intellectual level, I am really in awe of this movie. Mizoguchi manages to take what seems to be a really well-known story that I suspect extols the heroism of these 47 Ronin for avenging the death of their master and turns it into something altogether different. For one, he completely elides any scenes that would depict said heroism. The big act of revenge turns into a surprising McGuffin and instead what we have are a million scenes of people sitting around discussing the appropriateness of said act. There is obviously a lot of commentary on the elaborate code followed by these Samurai as well as its evolution in a more modern time, questioning of how it can stand in conflict with the legal system and other societal codes (of basic human decency and not using non-samurais as though they were simply costless collateral damage) which I think subverts the surface dignity of these rituals and points to what they mean in more practical terms.
By the end the overwhelming feeling I was left with was not of having witnessed something heroic at all but rather this huge sense of loss... this utter waste of so many human lives in pursuit of a dead man's egoistic demand for retribution.

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Mon Jun 16, 2014 1:49 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Yeah, Oyu is at the very least his fourth masterpiece.

_________________
Letterboxd
-
Blues | Honkies | Supreme | Live | IFFR 2012 | Old School | C & C C C | Jazz | Remember 2012


Mon Jun 16, 2014 2:51 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Yeah Oyu is right up there. I'm otherwise partial to Sisters of the Gion, Utamaro, Street of Shame, Oharu

_________________
I Watch Films, But...
In a word, I think that, far from favoring directors’ formal inventiveness, widescreen, instead, stifles it. It is, I’m more and more persuaded, if not the only, at least the main culprit for the expressive poverty of the image today. - Eric Rohmer
Vimeo / / / Flickr


Mon Jun 16, 2014 9:42 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Image

I've been watching some Mizoguchi. :)

Portrait of Madame Yuki was very pretty, but so... preposterous is the word I'm looking for, I think. Not that there isn't a kernal of truth in the relationships, but so much melodrama, and that ending! Miss Oyu, on the other hand, was really good. Great characters. I loved the sound, the way he stacks it – diegetic over non-diegetic, frogs over dialogue – so good! And, my eyes are still a little damp (don't tell anyone).

_________________
Incredibles 2 ▪ Young Frankenstein ▪ The Lair of the White Worm ▪ The Blob ▪ A Quiet Place ▪ King Kong (1933) ▪ Atomic Blonde ▪ Raw ▪ Rampage ▪ Detroit ▪ Before I Fall ▪ The Levelling ▪ A United Kingdom


Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Bookshelf


Wed Jun 18, 2014 11:12 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

iluvu :D :heart:
haha, you picked one of his virtual splitscreen screencaps :)! I can't disagree that Yuki is preposterous. He doesn't even necessarily (to my mind at least) put in a lot of effort to have her dependence on her husband come off as credible etc. In fact, this is something I feel about a number of his films now.. that I have to often accept certain relationships for what they are.. I can't quite tell if it's the style of acting that keeps me from feeling the chemistry between certain pairings or that he doesn't necessarily give me enough reasons to understand why two people are attracted to one another. I am thinking primarily of Yuki and Crucified Lovers.
I don't have that problem with Miss Oyu at all though. That scene at the beginning where he sees her for the first time... it's one of those rare instances where the love at first sight trope really works for me.

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Wed Jun 18, 2014 11:24 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

charulata wrote:
I can't disagree that Yuki is preposterous. He doesn't even necessarily (to my mind at least) put in a lot of effort to have her dependence on her husband come off as credible etc. In fact, this is something I feel about a number of his films now.. that I have to often accept certain relationships for what they are.. I can't quite tell if it's the style of acting that keeps me from feeling the chemistry between certain pairings or that he doesn't necessarily give me enough reasons to understand why two people are attracted to one another. I am thinking primarily of Yuki and Crucified Lovers.
Yeah, it's particularly obscure because he's limited in what he can have the characters say, right? She loves sex, and not just sex (which she could get with someone else), but a specific kind of sex. She's attracted to her husband in a very primitive way. I didn't have any trouble believing that, but her husband's about-face at the end? Haha.

_________________
Incredibles 2 ▪ Young Frankenstein ▪ The Lair of the White Worm ▪ The Blob ▪ A Quiet Place ▪ King Kong (1933) ▪ Atomic Blonde ▪ Raw ▪ Rampage ▪ Detroit ▪ Before I Fall ▪ The Levelling ▪ A United Kingdom


Voyage | Female Gaze | MACBETH | Sokurov | Fassbinder | Greenaway | Denis | Bookshelf


Wed Jun 18, 2014 11:50 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Image
Hahaha | Hong | 2010


On the surface this one might appear structurally simple or straightforward compared to a lot of his other films in that the bifurcated structure is handled sequentlally and clearly demarcated using those B&W stills and such. But the way the two narratives echo and rework each other is so seamless that I actually am even more in awe of its structure now than the more overtly complex ones. And it's so funny and a lot more gentle towards the male protagonists than most others. I think the mom character really gives it a different sense of balance just by having an older, more assured female character in the mix. And it's just so undeniably charming in the way the females rebuff the guys and the guys almost unknowingly revealing things about themselves that they never intended to. Loved this so much.

Image
Le révélateur | Garrel | 1968


More like a perfectly visually composed dream and yet not one that's entirely benign. No words to describe it but the title is perfect.

Image Image
Image Image
Image Image
Image Image

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Mon Nov 03, 2014 11:38 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

i thought that was one of his early ones?


Mon Nov 03, 2014 11:57 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

MrCarmady wrote:
i thought that was one of his early ones?

oops y, was cutting and pasting formatting from a different post and forgot to change..

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Mon Nov 03, 2014 12:16 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Char is watching Garrel now? Well, fuck.

_________________
“Bisogna essere molto forti per amare la solitudine.” - P.P. Pasolini

WCoF I II IIIL'EtàL'Eau한국88ShadowsBerlin thırd ISOLATIONVistaVision


Mon Nov 03, 2014 3:28 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Don't Go Breaking My Heart 2 | Johnnie To | 2014

If the 2011 film is the greatest romantic film made in recent times (which it is), then this to me is the To-Wai team's great anti-romance. Which is not to say that there aren't great romantic moments here... there are of course and they set the heart aflutter and everything. But most of the time the film is skewering those moments soon after. Those post-it note correspondences that endeared Louis Koo so much to us as well as Gao in the first movie have devolved into a pickup artist's lame formula. The grandiose skyscraper is now a prolonged construction project keeping the couple apart. And signs and coincidences are often deflated of meaning.. Louis Koo feeling breathless again ultimately means nothing. Connections formed over magical drunken nights don't necessarily endure the harsh glare of daylight. The past (both near and distant) haunts these characters continually and they all commit the inevitable human folly of letting that taint the present. Why is it that we sing sadly about lost loves when we are drunk as opposed to singing joyfully about what's on hand..Devastating ending .. and yet one leaves the film with a smile on one's face. Masters of deception, these ppl.

Also, hilarious.

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Sun Nov 16, 2014 12:00 pm
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

Image
Le ami de mon amie | Rohmer | 1987

What is there to say about this? It's delightful of course. This new tradition of starting my years with Rohmer is working out just fine so far. Has anyone ever portrayed female friendships as well as Rohmer does? All I want to do is to hang out with these women and go swimming and borrow that sailor dress from Emanuelle Chaulet.

Image
Manoel on the Island of Marvels | Ruiz | 1984

That first episode could possibly be the greatest film I've ever seen about childhood and all the anxieties therein. And then it just gets increasingly baffling and mysterious over the next two episodes and despite having no grasp on what it is I watched necessarily, it feels like the most wondrous dream ever. Somehow the whole experience is so emotionally resonant and large chunks of it are now just burnt into my memory... the chess games, the kids playing violently, the eerie disconcerting soundtrack, the boat rides, the shadowy pirate ghosts and most of all, the kids singing in unison which for whatever reason I found so incredibly moving. This already feels like a favorite of all time and yet, I am almost afraid of watching it again for fear it might not feel the same.

Image
The Days When I Don't Exist | Fitoussi | 2002

Loved this one and it actually might work well for Jediluv's Isolation thread too. It's a somewhat odd little film but in such a low key way that to describe it as such seems almost unfair. There's such an openness to the staging and cinematography that the whole film feels really welcoming and it wears it's conceit so lightly that we just buy into it effortlessly. There's such an easy rhythm to the way the ideas in the film pile up and by the time we get to the end it all gets has a real emotional heft. This Fitoussi guy seems really major to me but unfortunately this is the only film of his that seems available to watch at all?

_________________
Podcasts: Cinema on the Road (Ep #29: CHENNAI EXPRESS et al) | They Shot Pictures (Eps #25 & 26:2013 In Review) (w/ roujin, fist & Sean) *NEW

Blog |Twitter |MUBI
Char's Cinematic Caravan | Female Gaze | We Like to Watch | Czechoslovakian New Wave | Charulata's Directors' Throwdown | Director Marathon 1: Jean Renoir

"Life affirming doesn’t mean good things happen." - James Gray


Mon Jan 05, 2015 4:30 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

gross


Mon Jan 05, 2015 4:35 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

The Ruiz feeling is consistently great over rewatches for me, not the same feeling either but just as magical or ..., i'm not even a rewatch kind of person, ruiz :up: rewatch :up: ruiz rewatch :up: :up: :?


Mon Jan 05, 2015 4:38 am
Profile
User avatar
Reply with quote
Post Re: Char's Cinematic Caravan

charulata wrote:
That first episode could possibly be the greatest film I've ever seen about childhood and all the anxieties therein. And then it just gets increasingly baffling and mysterious over the next two episodes and despite having no grasp on what it is I watched necessarily, it feels like the most wondrous dream ever. Somehow the whole experience is so emotionally resonant and large chunks of it are now just burnt into my memory... the chess games, the kids playing violently, the eerie disconcerting soundtrack, the boat rides, the shadowy pirate ghosts and most of all, the kids singing in unison which for whatever reason I found so incredibly moving. This already feels like a favorite of all time and yet, I am almost afraid of watching it again for fear it might not feel the same.

it's the best


Mon Jan 05, 2015 12:57 pm
Profile WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 1777 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 32, 33, 34, 35, 36

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 23 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.