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 Recently Seen 
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la la land was really good


Sun Oct 09, 2016 3:00 am
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Epistemophobia wrote:
la la land was really good

Were you at the screening Gosling turned up to after?

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Sun Oct 09, 2016 6:49 am
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Captain Oats wrote:
Were you at the screening Gosling turned up to after?

yep

were you?!


Sun Oct 09, 2016 4:47 pm
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I got a free subscription to mubi because I have a subscription to cinefamily.

I just watched Full Frontal. Sometimes indescribable but very interesting movie. Soderberg is such an interesting film maker. Completely absent of anything really marketable but he keeps making interesting movies.

Edit: Wait, he directed the Ocean's Eleven movies. I don't know what the fuck I'm talking about.


Sun Oct 09, 2016 5:23 pm
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Epistemophobia wrote:
yep

were you?!

Nay. Didn't make it into the oversubscribed press screening either. :(

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Sun Oct 09, 2016 10:23 pm
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ARRIVAL was great

best director


Tue Oct 11, 2016 6:40 am
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The Handmaiden

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Tue Oct 11, 2016 6:48 am
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Epistemophobia wrote:
ARRIVAL was great

best director

Very excited about this! :D


Tue Oct 11, 2016 6:59 am
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loved personal shopper

k stew's best performance probably


Wed Oct 12, 2016 7:19 am
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excited about many of these films discussed recently

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Wed Oct 12, 2016 7:35 am
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certain women is looovely

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Wed Oct 12, 2016 6:08 pm
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Trip wrote:
certain women is looovely


probs my fav Reichardt

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Wed Oct 12, 2016 10:31 pm
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Trip wrote:
certain women is looovely

just saw it :fresh:


Thu Oct 13, 2016 5:10 am
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Things I've learned from A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night:

-Vampires can skateboard
-Kittehs don't like their genitals examined
-Muslim bitches wear their burkas while they blow you
-Iranian pimps ain't really so tough
-It's still a very good, stylishly made film with that drips atmosphere with lyrical pacing.


Wed Oct 19, 2016 10:16 am
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god I hated that movie

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Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:43 am
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Midnight Special (2016).

Thought about it for two or three weeks now, and the only angle I can come up with is that it's an attempt to put a positive spin on the experience of losing a young child to cancer or another disease.

The Call Up (2016).

The first half hour was so predictable and boring that I didn't finish it. Did I miss anything?

Night of the Creeps (1986).

For teh Rematchz Fred. Still love that movie.

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Thu Oct 20, 2016 7:38 am
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No horror thread this year? WTF bitches?


Thu Oct 20, 2016 11:49 am
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I recently saw almost one horror movie....


Thu Oct 20, 2016 12:04 pm
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Trip wrote:
god I hated that movie

SAME

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Sat Oct 22, 2016 12:08 am
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ribbon wrote:
SAME

:heart:

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Sat Oct 22, 2016 10:41 am
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Mean Old Bastard Ed wrote:
No horror thread this year? WTF bitches?

Eminence Grise wrote:
I recently saw almost one horror movie....

And I just watched an almost a horror movie.

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"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

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Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)
Images will disappear about 13 Feb 2018 forever.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

The Future Unreels will also lose all its images on the same day. But just think about how many images Jedi has on Photobucket, and the other posters here.


Sat Oct 22, 2016 12:46 pm
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Post Raiders Of The Lost Ark (Spielberg, '81)

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Inside the Ark is a treasure beyond your wildest dreams; you know you want it opened as much as I do. Indiana, we are simply passing through history. This... this is history.


If I were pressed to name a favorite action movie, Raiders Of The Lost Ark would almost certainly be it, although that isn't because I think it has the best, er, action of any film in the genre. Don't get me wrong, the stunts in this are good and all, but I can't really say they're the best I've ever seen or anything. Rather, it's the grand, larger-than-life adventure of Raiders' action/adventure hybrid that puts it over the top for me; from the opening dissolve from the Paramount Logo into a real-life Paramountain (so to speak), until its epic, iconic final shot of the Ark being lost in an endless warehouse, Raiders aims to entertain on a massive scale, and even though it should collapse under the weight of its (to be honest) ridiculous premise and scenarios, its sheer audacious nature instead transforms it into an absolute action classic, and just a classic film, period.

It achieves this minor miracle by constantly going big and then some, with shots of massive Nazi flags looming at us, Indiana casting shadows as big as the impact he's made on pop culture, and the impending wrath of God lurking through sudden gusts of wind, eeriely unnatural thunder storms, and ominous orchestration courtesy of the legendary John Williams. Its pure adventure pulp at its finest, although the film doesn't just excel in its broad strokes, but through smaller ones as well, namely its rich cast of characters.

Of course, Harrison Ford puts in a classic performance as the irresistibly charming, seasoned, but emotionally/physically vunerable Dr. Jones ("Snakes... why'd it have to be snakes?"), but Raiders is also notable for its unusually rich, well-rounded supporting cast, such as John Rhys-Davies's boisterous Egyptian archelogist Sallah, Paul Freeman's arrogant antagonist Belloq, or Ronald Lacey's incessantly quivering, fish-lipped Major Toht, which has to be, to this day, one of the creepiest fucking performances I've ever seen. Finally, Karen Allen makes for the perfect foil for Indy as the fiesty Marion Ravenwood, an old flame who's still stewing over the way he walked out of her life. The two have a great love/hate dynamic growing between them as the film goes on, and Allen adds a ton of the proverbial piss & vinegar (and alcohol) to the film's already strong sense of personality.

Besides all of that, Raiders' often sudden, shocking use of graphic violence lends it a real sense of danger, and makes you long for the days when the PG rating wasn't almost exclusively for slightly "edgier" animated movies aimed at pre-teens, like the Shreks of the world. And, while one could argue that its depiction of the "exotic" peoples present in its various locales is at best, an afterthought, and at worst, stereotypical, within the unrealistic, exaggerated context of the film, it's not so much offensive as it is there to enhance the overall adventerous, storybook feeling of Ark. The individual bits here all work together in order to serve the outstanding whole, and give Raiders more sheer character and personality than just about any other action movie out there, rendering it one of the grandest, most timeless entertainments out there in the end; don't miss this one for the world.
Final Score: 10

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Tue Oct 25, 2016 5:45 am
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Army of Shadows [L'armée des ombres] (1969) Jean-Pierre Melville.

Once again Melville fails to disappoint.

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"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread. Catalog Rounds 1-3
Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)
Images will disappear about 13 Feb 2018 forever.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

The Future Unreels will also lose all its images on the same day. But just think about how many images Jedi has on Photobucket, and the other posters here.


Thu Oct 27, 2016 11:06 am
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Eyes without a Face was a good choice for Halloween weekend.

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Fri Nov 04, 2016 3:39 pm
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I hope to watch Suspiria every Halloween till I die.

That razor-wire room is a stroke of genius, hahaha!

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Sun Nov 06, 2016 12:44 am
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Post The Terminator (Cameron, '84)

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Come with me if you want to live.


The Terminator presents one of the finest examples of a cinematic vision that, instead of being restrained by the various limitations imposed upon it, was enhanced by them in the end. Of course, the film wouldn't have worked at all without the raw storytelling talent a rookie James Cameron brought along, but it also just wouldn't have been the same without the dated-but-effective special effects necessitated by its era, as well as the relatively small scale dictated by its shoestring budget. In other words, if you're looking for proof that great art can arise out of adversity, this is one of the best examples out there.

The Terminator excels by being a relentless action film, a high-tech "slasher" movie, and sci/fi-noir all at once, interspersing visions of a man vs. machine war in a post-apocalyptic wasteland among scenes of a mid-80's Los Angeles, and, although the story takes place over the course of a couple of days, the city seems to be in nighttime 90% of the film, giving the whole affair a surreal edge, like a nightmare that will never, ever, end. Besides that, the story's use of the various mechanics and pardoxes that come with time travel is well thought out, while also avoiding becoming overly technical and confusing, as even Kyle Reese himself admits the he barely understands the situation, making him easy to root for as a sympathetic underdog, his mental confusion combining with his physical inadequacy against the Terminator.

Speaking of whom, Arnold Schwarzenegger puts in a star-making performance here, with his limited range and thick accent working together perfectly for the alienating, unstoppable machine, giving the role a chilling, predatory nature that he's never truly duplicated. Finally, Linda Hamilton works well as Sarah Connor, an overwhelmed everywoman who's suddenly thrust into becoming the last hope for humanity before she even comprehends what's going on, and all of that isn't even going into detail about The Terminator's rich cast of supporting characters, who Cameron develops strongly with relatively little screentime, and a trademark quick efficiency.

Finally, The Terminator suceeds through its innate sense of scope, brilliantly contrasting shoestring budget action and effects with its larger core concept, taking what is essentially a fight over one person into a battle for the fate of mankind itself, making its scale feel much larger the weightless battle for Earth of a "blockbuster" like The Avengers (sorry, fans!). The desperate ways that the characters react to the situation really gets across the tremendous weight of what's at stake here, making the struggle to save Sarah Connor into something so much bigger, so much more. Of course, I really like the slicker, more elaborate vibe of T2, but I'm also grateful for the more humble tone of the original Terminator, and find that it ends up working better because of all its limitations, and not the other way around. Like I said before, come with it if you want to live (and also watch a really good movie).
Final Score 8.75

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Sun Nov 06, 2016 1:21 pm
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Shin Godzilla is Godzilla via Evangelion sensibilities, razor sharp, lightning fast conversations about reputation and accountability punctuate lumbering, physical sequences of wonton destruction to a pretty brutally critical effect. It's nakedly critical of bureaucratic red tape and disaster relief in a way that makes for a really interesting contrast to the traditional monster sequences. it may be lacking in character empathy for some, but I think it's a fierce, interesting take on the genre of monster movie, by someone who has plenty of interesting things to say. Want more Hideaki Anno Godzillas for certain.

On a similar note, both parts of Attack on Titan, the live action film version strips out the dour, serious as shit tone of the source material for a mostly fun B movie romp, completely ridiculous in the ways you want it to be. The titan 'fights' feel more like a WWE wrestling match with a shitton of blood.

The Wave sucked, tho I think at the core of things, 'realistic disaster movie' is something a more capable director could do really interesting things with.

When Animals Dream, continuing the danish trend is beautifully lensed, a bit overdrawn at times, though ultimately it's a nice addition to a genre that doesn't typically get interesting things put forward, similar vibes to Ginger Snaps in terms of themes, but with an interesting mixture of pure arthouse and punk horror sensibilities that lend the film an intriguing flavor.

Moonlight
is probably the year's best film, understated in the ways you want it to be, but so uniquely 'other' in its cultural perspectives, from the soundtrack to the photography - it feels authentic to it's time, place and set of attitudes that breed such a repressed state of mind. Some gorgeously lonely cinematography, and I particularily like it's use of ellipsis on events that'd define a lesser film about the same thing.


Mon Nov 07, 2016 4:49 am
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Did you get a good audience for Moonlight? I recently read that article about someone's experience watching it with a bad audience.


Mon Nov 07, 2016 5:20 am
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bad, like walking out, booing? Nothing like that where I saw it, audience was quiet and generally seemed to be paying attention to the film where I saw it.


Mon Nov 07, 2016 5:31 am
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Das wrote:
bad, like walking out, booing? Nothing like that where I saw it, audience was quiet and generally seemed to be paying attention to the film where I saw it.

No like where they would laugh at the wrong places/things.


Mon Nov 07, 2016 5:36 am
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Nah.


Mon Nov 07, 2016 5:41 am
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Post Hard Boiled (Woo, '92)

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Give a guy a gun, and he thinks he's Superman!

I admit, when I first watched Hard Boiled over a decade ago, I didn't really like it; of course, I thought the action was motherfucking excellent, but nothing besides that really made an impression, and there was just so much of it that, in the end, it become rather mindless, repetitive, and numbing after a while. However, while I still can't say I'm in love with it or anything (I've never been a "great action automatically = great action movie" type), I can say that I better appreciate some of its non-action moments, its extremely skilled, graceful stuntwork, and John Woo's versatile, stylish direction of it all, leaving me, if not outright enamored with the film, still definitely entertained by it in the end.

First off, the story and characters in HB certainly don't shy away from certain gangster/cop cliches, complete with a disposable partner who exists to die in the first 5 minutes, a tormented undercover officer who doesn't know if his work has turned him into a crook himself, and our resident Irate Police Captain screaming "This is a fucking order!" at "Tequila", our resident Cop Who Doesn't Play By The Rules. All that being said, I now find Tony Leung's Alan more compelling than I used to, mostly due to Leung's memorably raw, tortured performance, but also because Woo slips in some good little character moments for him in and around the shootouts, just enough to make for a pretty good arc, in addition to some of the other characters getting good individual moments as well, even in the midst of all the carnage. The tension in the central pairing between Leung & Chow Yun-Fat, and the way they work against each other as much as together, really does add something here, and without it, the film just wouldn't be the same.

And, while the execution of some of Hard Boiled's other cliches still remains pretty mediocre in my eyes, it ultimately doesn't matter, as this really isn't a film that lives or dies based on its storytelling, and its still unique in the "heightened reality" it contains, where people pointlessly hide guns in birdcages and hollowed-out books for dramatic reveals, one lone cop can clear out an entire warehouse of baddies with a zipline and a few smoke grenades, and arms dealers hide their wares in secret storage rooms in hospital basements just so the film can have an excuse to blow up the place for a climax. It's one of the ultimate "rule of cool" films, and boy oh boy, is it ever cool.

But of course, any review of Hard Boiled would be remiss without discussing its action, which I've always felt is, pound-for-pound, probably the best of any movie out there; from the chaotic opening in the teahouse until the apocalyptic climax in the hospital, firearms and their destructive power are fetishized to the max here, with machine guns, shotguns, and (of course) dual-wielded pistols sending squibs, sparks, and debris exploding everywhere with round after round after glorious round, with Tequila gracefully diving around the endless waves of lead with brilliant stuntwork that makes even the most ludicrous moments look amazing, and Woo's camera alternating between kinetic cinematography and lovingly detailed slow-motion, never overdosing on one or the other, but keeping them in near-perfect balance in service of the almighty ACTION. Flaws aside, I don't think anyone could've filmed Hard Boiled as well as he did, and if you're a fan of action movies, then this is the perfect fit for you. Now, please allow me to exit this review in a slow-motion dive with two pistols in hand, if you will.
Final Score: 8

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Tue Nov 08, 2016 1:41 pm
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Jim Jarmusch's Gimme Danger, for Little White Lies

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Thu Nov 17, 2016 6:11 am
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Yeah, just saw Moonlight. Still processing, but it's definitely an exceptional film, for the reasons Das states above. If I have any criticism, it's that the film could have been tighter. Some of the plotting feels extraneous and generic in a way that distracts from the emotional core of the film without bringing much else to the table.

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Thu Nov 17, 2016 10:37 am
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Post Memento (Nolan, '00)

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The world doesn't just disappear when you close your eyes.

A hand holds up a fresh Polaroid picture, shakes it impatiently, and the image begins to... undevelop before our eyes, quickly fading back into a pale, white nothing. This opening shot of Christopher Nolan's Memento establishes the central "reverse-time" premise of the film, but the various ways Nolan experiments with and develops this concept over the course of the film makes it transcend and become much more than a throwaway gimmick, instead, utilizing it to its full potential to create what is easily one of the best, most mind-blowing movies I've seen in my life.

First off, yes, the plot of this film is rather complicated, and the way it unfolds in reverse order in nothing but quick, five minute fragments (alongside the parallel scenes that proceed in normal order) makes it all much, much harder to follow anyway; unless you're some kind of brilliant film savant, it will be impossible for you to absorb every little detail & nuance upon first watch, as the film practically demands for you to see it at least twice, preferably right after you've watched it the first time. However, rather than being annoyed at the Byzantine storytelling of Memento, I appreciate the confusion inherent in experiencing it, as this feeling is necessary for us to be able to sympathize with Guy Pearce's "Lenny", the ultimate unreliable narrator, a man caught in an absolute Sisyphean nightmare of an existence, albeit one that we come to learn is partly of his own making, as, at times, he chooses to rewrite the past to his own tragic whims, becoming his own worst enemy, his very own "John G.".

But, besides its various narrative contortions, another thing I really enjoy about Memento is just how emotional it really is; at least half of its appeal comes from the extensive efforts Nolan takes to make us emotionally empathize with Lenny, as we watch him struggle to make meaning out of his situation, burn the last batch of his late wife's belongings, and reminisce often about her lingering memory, showing himself to be a man haunted & trapped by the spectors of the past (represented literally by the ever-growing number of "clues" he obsessively tattoos onto his body). It's the way these calm, beautiful, melancholic moments alternate with the frantic, confused portions of Memento that round it out to be a truly full package of cinema, and help it transcend its potentially gimmick-y nature to become something much, much more. Whatever you do, don't forget to remember this one.
Final Score: 10

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Sat Nov 19, 2016 2:46 pm
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Your Name (Makoto Shinkai)
United States of Love (Tomasz Wasilewski)

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Mon Nov 21, 2016 1:14 am
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Macrology wrote:
Yeah, just saw Moonlight. Still processing, but it's definitely an exceptional film, for the reasons Das states above. If I have any criticism, it's that the film could have been tighter. Some of the plotting feels extraneous and generic in a way that distracts from the emotional core of the film without bringing much else to the table.

Some of the last section is tremendous. All of the actors deserve recognition for their work in this film.


Tue Nov 22, 2016 6:57 am
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The last act is tremendous and virtually perfect. My only problems were with the first third and the all-too-convenient plotting in the middle section.

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Tue Nov 22, 2016 7:41 am
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Post Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers (Jackson, '02)

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There's good in this world, Mister Frodo... and it's worth fighting for.

I've never really considered The Two Towers to be a "sequel" in the traditional Hollywood sense, rather, the middle part of the story that Fellowship began, but however you label it, I feel that TTT is one of the best examples of it around... whatever it may be. Ahem. Anyway, part of the film's success is due to its aforementioned middle chapter status, leaving it freer to explore its part of the saga's story without having to worry about the heavy weight of world-introduction that weighed its predecessor down some, or the sometimes redundant post-victory wrapup of Return Of The King. Granted, Towers does drag ever so slightly during its midsection, but considering its three hour length, necessary in order for Peter Jackson to adapt a sufficient amount of the rich, epic mythology that Tolkien created (with enough left over for a fourty-five minute longer Extended Edition), I can easily overlook that in light of all the epic fantasy entertainment we get in return here, and even viewed on a ten inch tablet screen, it's still one of the most epic things I've ever had the pleasure of watching.

In Towers, as the now-fractured Fellowship journeys ever so closer towards the dark land of Mordor, their battle for Middle Earth officially becomes an all-caps WAR, with an even larger scope and action setpieces to match it, introducing us to new realms as they are drawn against their will into the War of the Ring. However, PJ refuses to allow the scope of the film to swallow up its personal element, or resort to relying on stock fantasy archetypes, as all the new characters here are fully fleshed-out individuals with their own unique problems and desires, and as the new characters come into the story, Jackson also doesn't neglect to continue the arcs for the old players in natural, compelling manners. The devil's in the details here, and all the fantasy BS in the world wouldn't be worth a damn if we didn't care about the characters caught in the middle of it, but we do, and though there's way too many of them to write about in detail here, it's the multitude of small character moments included that ultimately keeps us engaged and invested in the larger struggle at hand.

But, as far as the epic fantasy aspects of TTT go, the movie certainly doesn't skimp on that part either, expanding on the world & mythology of Middle Earth brilliantly, hinting at a tragic, deeper history for a certain former Hobbit, bringing an undiscovered army of walking, talking fucking TREES into the fray, and resurrecting a previously thought-to-be deceased mentor from the dead in an unexpected twist. It's certainly a ton to unpack, but Jackson & Co. deliver everything superbly, and tonally, Towers keeps things fresh by taking on a surprisingly violent, war movie-ish tint, as the armies of men and others struggle to beat back the hideous forces of Sauron that are devastating the land, climaxing in a stormy, chaotic, absolutely grueling marathon of a battle at the fortress Helm's Deep, as well as two whole other battles occuring elsewhere simultaneously. The main battle at Helm's is hella long, but never feels pointless or repetitive, rather, extremely well-structured, as the overall progress of the clash is signified by easily identifiable turning points, which never get delayed amongst all the chaos, and in all the epic battles in cinematic history, it's one of the biggest and certainly one of the best of them as well, only outdone (possibly) by one in the next installment of Rings.

In all of this, Towers is definitely a darker film than its predecessor, often quite literally so, with many scenes set at night, as cinematographer Andrew Lesnie providing some of the bluest, most striking nighttime footage I've witnessed since T2, which serve as a great contrast to the sweeping, daytime landscape shots, which make perfect use of the beautiful New Zealand scenery as Middle Earth, as Howard Shore's soaring, triumphant themes boom at us. Along with these literal rays of light, the thematic glimmers of hope in TTT are what help keep our heads up amongst all the crushing darkness, and give us that special rush of magic that only grand fantasy can provide. Installment, sequel, whatever you want to call this, bottom line, the battle for Middle-Earth begins right fucking here, baby; join or die.
Final Score: 9

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Mon Nov 28, 2016 11:24 am
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Two Towers benefits a lot from the Extended Edition. Not as much as Rerturn of the King which I cant watch unless it's the extended edition.


Mon Nov 28, 2016 2:36 pm
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Ace wrote:
Two Towers benefits a lot from the Extended Edition. Not as much as Return of the King which I cant watch unless it's the extended edition.

Sans the extensions, The Two Towers always puts me to sleep. Imagine falling asleep in the theater while watching that film. I did it twice! But I watched the extended edition twice and did not even feel snoozy.

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"The wealthy and powerful always remind us that cream rises to the top.
What they fail to acknowledge is that pond scum also rises to the top.
And there is a lot more pond scum in the world than there is cream.
If you become rich and powerful, I hope that you will be cream rather than pond scum." --YTMN

YTMN's Remake Rematch Thread. Catalog Rounds 1-3
Thread abandoned 1 Aug 2017. Thread COMPLETE 25 May 14 (2d time!)
Images will disappear about 13 Feb 2018 forever.
I had fun. Thanks for reading!

The Future Unreels will also lose all its images on the same day. But just think about how many images Jedi has on Photobucket, and the other posters here.


Fri Dec 02, 2016 12:05 pm
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgCejsyS0t8


Sat Dec 03, 2016 9:06 am
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Post Re: Recently Seen

Gort wrote:
Sans the extensions, The Two Towers always puts me to sleep. Imagine falling asleep in the theater while watching that film. I did it twice! But I watched the extended edition twice and did not even feel snoozy.

They are really great films. I might try to watch the entire film at Christmas


Sat Dec 03, 2016 9:17 am
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I watched all extended editions on the same day, in theaters. Didn't feel tired at all. Those extensions certainly don't disrupt and might even help the flow.


Sun Dec 04, 2016 2:45 am
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I watched them in theaters too but it was a weekly thing. The extensions help TT and ROTK a lot more than they help Fellowship.


Sun Dec 04, 2016 5:47 am
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God, Intolerance really is just staggering. What a behemoth of a film.

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Fri Dec 09, 2016 10:08 am
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I recently watched Watchmen for the first time since its release, and time has not been particularly kind to it:

It starts with about 5 minutes of quiet, awkward TV exposition that Zack Snyder’s heart obviously wasn’t into, after which we’re treated to what he really wanted to show, which is a long, loud, gratuitous fight scene that makes ridiculous use of Nat King Cole’s “Unforgettable” on the soundtrack for irony points, before clumsily transitioning into a slow-motion historical montage we can’t possibly fully appreciate yet (and I say this as someone who’s read the comic), complete with references to Andy Warhol, David Bowie, and “The Last Supper” of all things, all while Bob Dylan sings “The Times They Are A-Changin”, because it’s not like the movie just had a famous song on its soundtrack or anything.

It’s these first 15 minutes or so of the film that can be viewed as a microcosm of Snyder’s career in general; he finds some famous existing material to “adapt” (read: provide all the substance and cover for his lack of ideas), while he directs pretty visuals with a reliance on slo-mo that borders on the pornographic, which compensates poorly for his weak handle on story structure & pacing, as well as his tendency to shoehorn in cultural & historical touchpoints and obvious, surface-level symbolism he doesn't know how to deliver, or even understand, I suspect, leaving us with a film that almost completely fails to earn the weight of it’s source material’s heady themes. Snyder’s far more interested in loud noises, ridiculous fight scenes, and comically gratuitous gore than the deconstruction of superhero myths that made Watchmen such a watershed in comic history.

Don’t get me wrong, there are things about this that are good, like the loyalty Snyder has to the ambitious, audacious concepts birthed in Alan Moore’s original work, or the occasional moment he executes well without coasting off the source material (the scene where Laurie explores Nite Owl’s basement lair has a legitimate sense of wonder), and a lot of the visual style is pretty memorable, from the impressive imagery & special effects to the stylish cinematography, to the production, art, & costume design that brings the gritty, heightened reality of the film’s alternate-history 1985 to vivid life.

But all of those positives are hindered by Snyder’s almost complete inability to go small or subtle with his storytelling in any way; he certainly isn’t afraid to go BIG (in addition to going s l o w, of course), but almost every moment here that would’ve benefited from a quieter, more intimate touch lacks that approach, and pretty much every part of the film is forced into being yet another big moment in a neverending stream of them, whether it’s called for in that particular scene or not. Again, don’t get me wrong, there are elements of Snyder’s direction that, with some significant retooling, could’ve made for an awesome adaptation here, but as it stands in its current form, Watchmen just doesn’t work for me in the end. A shame, a shame, a shame.
Final Score: 6

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Sat Dec 17, 2016 7:07 am
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Once again. That is also a movie that benefits from the extended edition.


Sat Dec 17, 2016 7:35 am
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Ace wrote:
Once again. That is also a movie that benefits from the extended edition.
I was watching the EE of that one, and the new bits of footage either didn't improve the overall experience, or fit in like a sore thumb (like the new stuff with Hollis Mason); Snyder thinks that just being mostly faithful to a famous source work will automatically make up for his deficiencies and make his "adaptation" of it good, instead of focusing on making the general story work out in a cinematic context. I think it was possible to make a good Watchmen movie, but Zack was just never the right man for the job.

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Sat Dec 17, 2016 10:13 am
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Snyder has always been poor at adapting narrative to the big screen. Not that the narratives are poor, mind you.


Sun Dec 18, 2016 1:59 am
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